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Thread: Growing Number of MacBook Pro Users Complain of Display Anti-Reflective Coating Wearing

  1. #1
    Default Growing Number of MacBook Pro Users Complain of Display Anti-Reflective Coating Wearing


    A growing number of 2012-2014 MacBook Pro users are complaining on Apple's online support forums about an issue relating to the displays on the machine. These MacBook Pro users appear to have their anti-reflective coating wearing off of their displays, leaving the user with a very dissatisfying display experience that looks like a very bad window tinting job, as shown above.

    The reasoning for the issues appears to be varying some have said that the issue is due to the acid from the users' fingers lingering on the keyboard keys and then transferring to the display while the notebook is closed, while others have said the issue has happened from light display cleaning with a microfiber cloth and cleaner.

    Although there are tons of pictures of this happening in the conversation, the picture above is one of the worst we've seen. The user reports that the Apple Store he visited refused to replace the display and retorted saying that he would have to pay to have it replaced if he wanted a new one. Other users with this issue have reported varying levels of success with getting free replacements at their Apple Stores under the AppleCare warranty.

    Obviously, this is something that users feel they shouldn't have to pay to replace, as the display is an integral part of the MacBook Pro experience and without a display to look at clearly, you can't really use the computer as expected.

    The ongoing debate between Apple and these customers is that it's a cosmetic defect that clearly stemmed from the user's use of the machine, although users feel that this never should have happened in the first place.

    Hopefully Apple changes their minds so that they will not have to waste the money to buy a new, pricey display.

    Sources: Apple via MacRumors

  2. #2
    i understand not every company is perfect but i think stuff like this obviously should be replaced for free. otherwise I'm not sure how oil from your fingers are transferring like that or cleaning the screen, something is still a little weird about that. I'm curious to really find out what these people are really doing.

  3. #3
    Oil is transferred to the screen via the keyboard. The screens on modern laptops close so close that they actually touch the keyboard. Go to an Apple store or Best Buy, type on a ultra book or thin laptop, close the lid, then raise it back up. Look at the screen at an angle and you'll see the outline of the keyboard.

    I'd say the example above is more than just casual or even heavy typing. It looks like there was significant weight or pressure consistently applied to the top of the laptop.

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  5. #4
    I'm addicted to jailbreak luvmytj's Avatar
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    There appears to be obvious scratch marks like someone did some of that on purpose.

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    iPhone? More like MyPhone mallenass's Avatar
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    apple has enough money to exchange every non iphone users phone for a free iphone, and give a free iphone to every other user in the planet. and still make a profit.....

    so that they would be giving me lip instead of a brand new lap top if mine wears out is disrespectful....

  7. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by JoeStorm View Post
    Oil is transferred to the screen via the keyboard. The screens on modern laptops close so close that they actually touch the keyboard. Go to an Apple store or Best Buy, type on a ultra book or thin laptop, close the lid, then raise it back up. Look at the screen at an angle and you'll see the outline of the keyboard.

    I'd say the example above is more than just casual or even heavy typing. It looks like there was significant weight or pressure consistently applied to the top of the laptop.
    This isn't true, or at least for ASUS ultrabooks, there is a 2mm space between the keyboard and screen when it's closed so this will only happen if pressure is applied to it. If you treat your laptop nicely this shouldn't ever happen.

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