Since becoming CEO of Apple more than three years ago, Tim Cook has been on the front lines of myriad efforts to reduce and eliminate the scourge of discrimination from the workplace and life as we know it.

Having admitted publicly this year that he is, himself, a gay man, Cook has become a hero to many in the LGBT (lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender) community. Consequently, lawmakers around the country are recognizing Cook's contributions and are seeking to honor his anti-discrimination efforts while extending their own.

In Cook's home state of Alabama, for example, state Rep. Patricia Todd says she intends to name an anti-discrimination act after Apple's CEO. And the company is okay with the move.

Previously, we're told, Apple wasn't on board with including Cook's name.

Shortly after announcing her plans, however, Todd said she received a call from Apple asking her not to name the bill for Cook, adding they didn't want to be involved in what could become a heated political battle. Todd agreed to change the name of the bill but on Tuesday, she said she received a call from Bruce Sewell, Apple's general counsel and senior vice president of Legal and Government Affairs.
"He apologized profusely and said there was an employee that was trying to protect Apple from controversy," Todd is quoted by AL.com. "He said 'I'm here to assure you we support this 100 percent."

Source: AL.COM