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Thread: FBI Director Continues Fight against Smartphone Security Stating it’s Too Strong

  1. #1
    What's Jailbreak? Akshay Masand's Avatar
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    Default FBI Director Continues Fight against Smartphone Security Stating it’s Too Strong


    The director of the US Federal Bureau of Investigation, James Comey, appears to have slammed Apple’s iPhone and devices running Android that can hold secure, encrypted data that is inaccessible by law enforcement, stating that these capabilities allow users to “place themselves beyond the law.” These remarks came during an interview with 60 Minutes where Comey said he believes unbreakable encryption of user data has “gone too far,” while expressing concern that even with a legal court order, the information secured on a smartphone could be kept secret.
    Comey continued by stating the following:

    The notion that we would market devices that would allow someone to place themselves beyond the law troubles me a lot. As a country, I don't know why we would want to put people beyond the law. That is, sell cars with trunks that couldn't ever be opened by law enforcement with a court order, or sell an apartment that could never be entered even by law enforcement. Would you want to live in that neighborhood?
    For those of you who didn’t already know, Comey made similar comments in a separate interview previously where he said he believes privacy features in both Apple’s iOS and Google’s Android allow users to put themselves “above the law.” Despite his stance on the matter, he did stress that there should be restrictions, review and oversight when it comes to law enforcement, which one may think would be the opposite of what he wants.

    The slew of new security features in Apple’s iOS 8 platform make it very difficult for the company to decrypt-on-device data even if the law enforcement agencies were to provide the proper warrants to do so. If an iPhone has been locked with a secure passcode, Apple doesn’t have a method to bypass that code. This secure system is based on encryption keys which aren’t stored by Apple off-site, which means the only way to access the contents of the phone is by entering the appropriate code necessary to do so. That being said, any information sent to iCloud or other servers are “fair game” when it comes to government data requests.

    How do you feel about the matter? Share your thoughts with us below! Those of you who are interested in watching the video can do so by hitting the source link below!

    Source: CBS News

    Twitter: @AkshayMasand

  2. #2
    Livin' the SPIDEY Life SpiderManAPV's Avatar
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    My thoughts? Screw them. I'll encrypt whatever I want. Maybe we wouldn't be "putting ourselves above the law" if they could keep their greedy data mining hands to themselves. You want us to not be worried about our privacy? Stop making it a worry.

    P.S. I'll give them my private keys the day they give out theirs. Maybe.

    ......beware......
    Just your friendly neighborhood Spider-Man!

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  4. #3
    What about my brain. Can you enter that?
    If there was a way to completely secure an apt or trunk it would be done. The problem it that's a physical thing that can be opened with force. You cannot compare that to a phone. If someone didn't want you to see what is on their computer they could make that happen too.
    I don't understand why the government sees a smartphone as a separate device. It's just a small computer. The amount of legislation they want passed regarding smartphones is ridiculous. The laptop has been around for decades and there is nothing on the books for that.
    They seen an opportunity to stick their hand into the game finally.

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  6. #4
    The FBI and NSA have gone insane with power. They think they have the right to poke through everything you own if they so much as suspect you of something - they do not. THEY are the ones that are above the law.

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  8. #5
    get a warrant when you need to see peoples data, until then suck it
    privacy isn't about having something to hide, another view here

    look here all grammar police, indulge me.

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  10. #6
    How dare us want to keep our private files private.

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  12. #7
    Ok, I am getting a bit confused:
    FBI - Phone security is too strong
    Local Police - Phone security isn't strong enough and allows theft.

    Who's right, who's wrong?

    As for the way Apple handles encryption now, there are many companies that do the same thing, why should Apple be obliged to provide a back door? If a back door existed for law enforcement, then criminals could figure out how to use it.
    Last edited by cmwade77; 2014-10-14 at 05:24 AM.

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  14. #8
    Livin' the SPIDEY Life SpiderManAPV's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cmwade77 View Post
    Ok, I am getting a bit confused:
    FBI - Phone security is too strong
    Local Police - Phone security isn't strong enough and allows theft.

    Who's right, who's wrong?

    As for the way Apple handles encryption now, there are many companies that do the same thing, why should Apple be obliged to provide a back door? If a back door existed for law enforcement, then criminals could figure out how to use it.
    That's part of the problem. They need to figure out what they want.

    ......beware......
    Just your friendly neighborhood Spider-Man!

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  16. #9
    Spiderman AVP +1
    Kotin6006 +1

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  18. #10
    My private info is private so FBI suck it I do not need big brother watching over me

  19. #11
    You people are so deluded. The Government doesn't need to spy on you. You spy on yourselves, and give your personal information to the Government when you use social networking. People use their smartphone cameras to record videos which go right to youtube, pictures which go to instagram, and usage data which goes back to the companies.

    All this NSA hate is pissing me off. Look in the mirrors to see the real people who are spying on you.

  20. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by SpidermanAPV View Post
    My thoughts? Screw them. I'll encrypt whatever I want. Maybe we wouldn't be "putting ourselves above the law" if they could keep their greedy data mining hands to themselves. You want us to not be worried about our privacy? Stop making it a worry.

    P.S. I'll give them my private keys the day they give out theirs. Maybe.
    My thoughts, although undoubtedly difficult to keep tabs on us I think they still can and that there is some posturing here.

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  22. #13
    Innocent until proven guilty NOT presumed guilty until proven guilty.

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  24. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by cmwade77 View Post
    Ok, I am getting a bit confused:
    FBI - Phone security is too strong
    Local Police - Phone security isn't strong enough and allows theft.

    Who's right, who's wrong?

    As for the way Apple handles encryption now, there are many companies that do the same thing, why should Apple be obliged to provide a back door? If a back door existed for law enforcement, then criminals could figure out how to use it.
    Apples and Oranges. The two are unrelated.
    The FBI is concerned that the data encryption is too strong and they can't take your phone from you and see every single thing on it (rather than going the legal route and getting the data from your carrier/provider).
    The Police is concerned that security is so low that if your phone is stolen, anyone can use it.

    Honestly, they're both idiots.

  25. #15
    Livin' the SPIDEY Life SpiderManAPV's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Raptor2213 View Post
    Apples and Oranges. The two are unrelated.
    The FBI is concerned that the data encryption is too strong and they can't take your phone from you and see every single thing on it (rather than going the legal route and getting the data from your carrier/provider).
    The Police is concerned that security is so low that if your phone is stolen, anyone can use it.

    Honestly, they're both idiots.
    They aren't completely unrelated. Both of them want access to the data. Thou difference is that the FBI want to keep it and crooks want to modify it.

    ......beware......
    Just your friendly neighborhood Spider-Man!

  26. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by nakedcrook View Post
    You people are so deluded. The Government doesn't need to spy on you. You spy on yourselves, and give your personal information to the Government when you use social networking. People use their smartphone cameras to record videos which go right to youtube, pictures which go to instagram, and usage data which goes back to the companies.

    All this NSA hate is pissing me off. Look in the mirrors to see the real people who are spying on you.
    The NSA point is a bad point, Because this is about the FBI, there different

    Your the deluded one, what you share socially is your choice the info you don't want to be seen by other people you keep private and that's what they want to see
    Last edited by dsg; 2014-10-14 at 05:06 PM.
    privacy isn't about having something to hide, another view here

    look here all grammar police, indulge me.

  27. #17
    Livin the iPhone Life bigboyz's Avatar
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    They already have access to anything they want on our phones per Snowden. Not a big revelation here. Now they are being up front and public about it is the only difference. You don't have to have a smart phone its a choice not a mandatory life line. Maybe its time to get an old school flip phone hahaha!

  28. #18
    He basically says "I am THE law, nothing should ever be out of MY PERSONAL control!"

  29. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by Jahooba View Post
    The FBI and NSA have gone insane with power. They think they have the right to poke through everything you own if they so much as suspect you of something - they do not. THEY are the ones that are above the law.
    Well said.

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