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Thread: iOS 8.3 Puts an End to Using iExplorer, iFunBox, and Other iOS File Browsing Apps on Stock Devices

  1. #21
    We pay A Lot Of Money for theses phones, (iPhone 6 here) and we shouldn't be told what we can and can not do with it. Its our devices and we are responsible for our own actions, so we should be able to jailbreak if we so choose

  2. #22
    The only way for me to clean up space on my iPad left behind by partially watched movies is with i explorer. This is way too much control and bad news from wall to wall. No more software update for me I guess.

  3. #23
    Code Dependent NewD's Avatar
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    Default iOS 8.3 Puts an End to Using iExplorer, iFunBox, and Other iOS File Browsing ...
    Quote Originally Posted by studderman View Post
    We pay A Lot Of Money for theses phones, (iPhone 6 here) and we shouldn't be told what we can and can not do with it. Its our devices and we are responsible for our own actions, so we should be able to jailbreak if we so choose
    Though I actually fairly regularly feel exactly what you're talking about there… What most people on this topic fail to understand is that Apple could really care less about the jailbreak community and its needs and desires… At even the most liberal estimates the jailbreakers comprise about 1.6 to 1.8% of the entire iPhone user-base. We're an insignificant blip on Apple's screen. What they do care about is security. And they can get millions and millions of dollars worth of lawsuits if important information is stolen off of phones especially with all of these people in the office world having exchange accounts on their phones with important and sometimes classified information in the emails. The holes and exploits that allow us to jailbreak, are, to Apple, security breaches from which sensitive data can be stolen. That's why Apple locks up our phones and closes jailbreak exploits. Apple will never cease being interested in a fully secure locked up phone. That will never change!

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  5. #24
    Quote Originally Posted by NewD View Post
    Though I actually fairly regularly feel exactly what you're talking about there… What most people on this topic fail to understand is that Apple could really care less about the jailbreak community and its needs and desires… At even the most liberal estimates the jailbreakers comprise about 1.6 to 1.8% of the entire iPhone user-base. We're an insignificant blip on Apple's screen. What they do care about is security. And they can get millions and millions of dollars worth of lawsuits if important information is stolen off of phones especially with all of these people in the office world having exchange accounts on their phones with important and sometimes classified information in the emails. The holes and exploits that allow us to jailbreak, are, to Apple, security breaches from which sensitive data can be stolen. That's why Apple locks up our phones and closes jailbreak exploits. Apple will never cease being interested in a fully secure locked up phone. That will never change!
    I'm not saying you are wrong, but in the end, the phone/pad/pod belongs to the user, and like any other computer system that one owns, one has every right to maintain control over it and it's operation. This isn't a matter of how many people jail-break, it's about the maker arresting control over something they really have no right to control. Suggesting and encouraging the installation of security updates is one thing (and often a very good thing), and frankly this is how it works in OS X.

    The core problem as I see it with iOS devices is Apple is acting like they own the devices. One cannot even make the decision as to what version of the OS to install, as one must literally seek permission prior to installation, with no way to override that. Once again, if the verification of the OS/IPSW was more of a suggestion, that would be one thing, but as it stands, we are dealing with computing devices where rightful control has continually been stripped away from the owners of said devices.
    Last edited by alanjf; 2015-04-14 at 07:30 AM. Reason: Typo

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  7. #25
    Quote Originally Posted by cpotoso View Post
    Control freaks! I do despise my android phone and tablet (the OS is lousy), but can't fathom going to a system in which I do not own the device I paid for.
    I decided long time ago after buying my iPad Air not to buy any apple devices. It takes my valuable time on waiting for jailbreake, not to upgrade certain versions, no many basic functions, all ****** controls by Apple..... I really hate apple. Now only I can feel the taste of freedom enjoyed by android users even the OS is not beautiful than iOS.

    My next phone I'm looking for an Android...

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  9. #26
    Quote Originally Posted by X-Men View Post
    I decided long time ago after buying my iPad Air not to buy any apple devices. It takes my valuable time on waiting for jailbreake, not to upgrade certain versions, no many basic functions, all ****** controls by Apple..... I really hate apple. Now only I can feel the taste of freedom enjoyed by android users even the OS is not beautiful than iOS.

    My next phone I'm looking for an Android...
    You hate apple? That's harsh, they make awesome devices. And as for taking up your valuable time I'm sure you don't just sit in the house doing nothing at all because you're not jailbroken.... Waiting for a jailbreak is different to taking up your time

  10. #27
    What's J*******k? Sage I's Avatar
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    I'm surprised it took apple so long to put a stop to all the file system browsers we've used over the years...

  11. #28
    Code Dependent NewD's Avatar
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    Default iOS 8.3 Puts an End to Using iExplorer, iFunBox, and Other iOS File Browsing ...
    Quote Originally Posted by alanjf View Post
    I'm not saying you are wrong, but in the end, the phone/pad/pod belongs to the user, and like any other computer system that one owns, one has every right to maintain control over it and it's operation. This isn't a matter of how many people jail-break, it's about the maker arresting control over something they really have no right to control. Suggesting and encouraging the installation of security updates is one thing (and often a very good thing), and frankly this is how it works in OS X.

    The core problem as I see it with iOS devices is Apple is acting like they own the devices. One cannot even make the decision as to what version of the OS to install, as one must literally seek permission prior to installation, with no way to override that. Once again, if the verification of the OS/IPSW was more of a suggestion, that would be one thing, but as it stands, we are dealing with computing devices where rightful control has continually been stripped away from the owners of said devices.
    You make good points - but your comparison to a home computer's OS falls short. A phone is a mobile device that grabs its data from the air (LTE) or mobile hotspots or private networks. A home or office computer can sit behind complex firewalled networks aiding in security and being virtually impregnable by hackers. Some wifi hotspots are also well protected - others not so.. Do you know where the number 1 breach of personal data security comes from? Identity theft? It comes from smartphones.. I think I read by a factor of 10 over home and office computing systems and even at twice the rate of unshredded physical documents.

    So Apple's motivation, again, has nothing to do with desiring to "keep ownership from you".. They "act like co-owners" to protect their azzes from law suits, pure and simple. I would imagine their main litigation problems are from stolen sensitive data.

    Listen I hear your plea.. If litigation against stolen data is such an issue why wouldn't Android OS be similarly devoted to locking up their phones? Well it's because Android isn't the hardware developer too. Apple is responsible for both hardware and firmware. There are too many different smartphone manufacturers utilizing AndroidOS to create as closed and secure a system as Apple has. Apple has more to lose legally too.

    So smartphone versus desktop/laptop isn't the right comparison to make. A smartphone is waaay less potentially secure than the latter.

  12. #29
    Hmmmmm, now I am confused.....Apple is not supporting jailbreak....OK, fine....But I am stubborn and I want to jailbreak MY iPhone...and I do it....woooooow, I was not careful enough....my data get stollen...but damn, it was my decision...it's my fault....I am stupid...the question is, what kind of legal problem Apple could have, because I made a mistake with something that Apple doesn't support???

    BTW, were there any cases that data were stolen from any jailbroaken device?
    Last edited by bbrks; 2015-04-14 at 02:08 PM.

  13. #30
    Quote Originally Posted by NewD View Post
    A phone is a mobile device that grabs its data from the air (LTE) or mobile hotspots or private networks.
    So does nearly every laptop out there, via wifi or even 3G/4G (either built in or an add-on card.) Same goes for desktops too. This alone doesn't suddenly mean one is to loose control over the system which they own.

    Do you know where the number 1 breach of personal data security comes from? Identity theft? It comes from smartphones..
    Actually the primary vector is social engineering. It really has little to do with the platform being used, as the main avenues used as the likes of Facebook and other social media related networks, as well as E-mail and IM. Or even physical communication. Or even the theft of one's mail.

    So Apple's motivation, again, has nothing to do with desiring to "keep ownership from you"..
    But this is still the end result. No amount of sugar-coating it is going to change that.

    They "act like co-owners" to protect their azzes from law suits, pure and simple.
    What gives them any right to act like "co-owners"? Once a device is fully purchased, it belongs to the purchaser. How can they be a part owner? And what gives them the right to hold control away from the rightful owners?

    I would imagine their main litigation problems are from stolen sensitive data.
    Why? This doesn't happen with laptops and desktops, as users are expected to watch out for themselves, as it's their responsibility. How is it suddenly different when the size of the device shrinks? It's still a computing device.

    Listen I hear your plea.. If litigation against stolen data is such an issue why wouldn't Android OS be similarly devoted to locking up their phones?
    I work in IT and regularly have people asking me to assist them with rooting, which generally isn't a problem, as Google nor most handset vendors go out of their way to prevent it like Apple does. In fact it's only gotten easier to do so. Even on many cheap tablets and phones, as well as higher end ones.

    Jail-breaking iOS is great and I love it (and it is my primary mobile platform), but you don't have the same piece of mind where you can freely root and un-root as well as change OS versions (or install custom versions) at will.

    Apple is responsible for both hardware and firmware. There are too many different smartphone manufacturers utilizing AndroidOS to create as closed and secure a system as Apple has. Apple has more to lose legally too.
    How so? What exactly is this really based on? How is it any more problematic then a full-sized laptop or desktop computer? I really don't see why so many people see tablets and smart phones as something other than palm top computers, which is what they are, regardless of the operating system.

    So smartphone versus desktop/laptop isn't the right comparison to make. A smartphone is waaay less potentially secure than the latter.
    I honestly disagree, as a tablet or smartphone is no less or more secure than a laptop or netbook running on cellular or wifi. In either case the danger is much the same. Especially when you consider that more compromises than not come from the likes of social engineering then from actual cracking, he latter of which is more often coordinated against companies and data-centers rather than individual users.

    The form-factor of the computer should in no way be dictating if control should have to be given up (e.g., just because it's small and mobile.)

  14. #31
    Superbad Modder-ator Simon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by NewD View Post
    At even the most liberal estimates the jailbreakers comprise about 1.6 to 1.8% of the entire iPhone user-base.
    You making figures up again bud? Naughty, naughty

    Only estimates I have seen are the ones Saurik gave a few years back, more in the 6-12% range depending on current availability of a jailbreak for the latest firmware. Source: Saurik (Jay Freeman) Speaks At MyGreatFest About Mac OS X Cydia

  15. #32
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    Default iOS 8.3 Puts an End to Using iExplorer, iFunBox, and Other iOS File Browsing ...
    Quote Originally Posted by alanjf View Post
    How so? What exactly is this really based on? How is it any more problematic then a full-sized laptop or desktop computer? I really don't see why so many people see tablets and smart phones as something other than palm top computers, which is what they are, regardless of the operating system.
    When you 'cherry pick' quote a person - you end up missing the answers to you own questions . So I'll repeat myself: When you're on LTE (which laptops can't access currently) there is little to no firewall protection possible.. Laptops and desktops (and smartphones with Wifi switched on, of course) attached to WIFI or LAN systems can be sitting behind much safer firewall systems. A smartphone on LTE cannot.

    I honestly disagree, as a tablet or smartphone is no less or more secure than a laptop or netbook running on cellular or wifi. In either case the danger is much the same.
    We can agree to disagree then.. But Apple knows what I'm saying is the case. LTE is much more susceptible to hacking by virtue of there being no firewalling you can really add when you're in your car. While on WIFI - of course.. But not on LTE. There is a big difference in security level...

    But even if we leave the security level issue behind.. Let's not also forget that iPhone - the most ubiquitous smartphone used in the world now (moved past Android last year) - Apple is concerned that everyone have the same quality experience. They've always claimed that openly. My issue with most of what you're saying is that you're asking the wrong questions. They're trying to 'help' you always have a phone that works and works reliably. Not trying to steal your freedom. If you've spent a month with an Android (which I have on several occasions - purchased then returned within 30 days) - you'll be back to Apple in a heartbeat.. Buggiest OS on the planet.. Google's pure Android is quite nice - but still not Apple..

    To be very clear… You and I are on the same side of the argument when it comes to the "I purchased it - it's mine-leave me the hell alone" argument!! ;-) - that is, of course, after your contract period is up. You're not the true owner until you finish the two-year contract for subsidized phones.

    Quote Originally Posted by Simon View Post
    You making figures up again bud? Naughty, naughty
    Only estimates I have seen are the ones Saurik gave a few years back, more in the 6-12% range depending on current availability of a jailbreak for the latest firmware. Source: Saurik (Jay Freeman) Speaks At MyGreatFest About Mac OS X Cydia
    Hmm.. I'm just repeating other estimates I've heard from quality sources like King and others.. But even 6-12 is an 'insignificant' blip.. and that was my main point...
    Last edited by NewD; 2015-04-14 at 07:52 PM.

  16. #33
    Superbad Modder-ator Simon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by NewD View Post

    Hmm.. I'm just repeating other estimates I've heard from quality sources like King and others.. But even 6-12 is an 'insignificant' blip.. and that was my main point...
    Well, no disrespect to King and whoever else may have told you that but I think I'll trust Sauriks figures more. A quick google will show similar results: What percentage of iPhones have been jailbroken? - Quora

    Considering about 700 million iPhones have sold total, 6% of that would be 42 million. Granted, that doesn't mean that many devices are jailbroken at this moment, but still significant nonetheless IMO. Apple obviously finds jailbreaks significant enough to research them and the exploits they use so that they can close these holes. Not saying they care about the jailbreak community's wants/needs but I'd say we definitely appear on their radar.

  17. #34
    Quote Originally Posted by NewD View Post
    When you 'cherry pick' quote a person - you end up missing the answers to you own questions . So I'll repeat myself: When you're on LTE (which laptops can't access currently) there is little to no firewall protection possible.. Laptops and desktops (and smartphones with Wifi switched on, of course) attached to WIFI or LAN systems can be sitting behind much safer firewall systems. A smartphone on LTE cannot.
    1) Actually I've seen 4G as well as 3G cards for laptops before. Even they aren't actually in LTE flavor, I don't see why that would matter when 3G and some 4G flavors clearly do exist for full (desktops, laptops) and mid size (net/ultra books) computers.

    2) As for your comment about the lack of firewalls on a cellular connection, that isn't really true, as the carrier is actually running one big firewall on their end, which is why you normally see an IP address in a private range, typically 10.x.y.z, rather than a public one. One cannot normally just connect to another cellular device even if you know the IP address being currently used on the carrier's network, due to the firewalling, which on most carriers ends up working similarly to isolation mode on some wifi access points and routers.

    If anything, public wifi networks are where most concerns should be aimed at, as that is where one can be the most vulnerable.
    Last edited by uri8472; 2015-04-14 at 10:19 PM. Reason: Spelling correction

  18. #35
    Quote Originally Posted by NewD View Post
    We can agree to disagree then.. But Apple knows what I'm saying is the case. LTE is much more susceptible to hacking by virtue of there being no firewalling you can really add when you're in your car. While on WIFI - of course.. But not on LTE. There is a big difference in security level...
    Last I checked most carriers don't give you a public IP address over LTE as well as regular 3G/4G links, but instead usually a private one, indicating that the connection is behind a router. But even if you did get a public IP, this would be no different than any other Internet connection where one plugs their modem into their computer directly. Or IPv6 where public addresses are often used directly.

    At any rate, how does this suddenly mean that Apple has any right to arrest control from the rightful owners of such devices past the point of a fully completed sale? When did it stop becoming the responsibility of a user to secure their own data?

  19. #36
    Code Dependent NewD's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by alanjf View Post
    At any rate, how does this suddenly mean that Apple has any right to arrest control from the rightful owners of such devices past the point of a fully completed sale? When did it stop becoming the responsibility of a user to secure their own data?
    They haven't "arrested control" of your phone - they've simply only allowed their most current firmware with its "fixes" and "best security" to be available to you. Thus preventing hundreds of thousands of tech support calls from the average idiot trying to mess with some system file (s)he has no business messing with..

    Listen I hear your plea, as a 'power user', I want more control too.. But Apple's business/tech/security models are sound and part of what's made them the most successful consumer electronics company in the history of the world.

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  21. #37
    Quote Originally Posted by NewD View Post
    They haven't "arrested control" of your phone - they've simply only allowed their most current firmware with its "fixes" and "best security" to be available to you.
    They may not have taken full control of the device, but they do force the install process of the OS to seek permission from them in order to proceed. That is a problem. As the owner of the device, only I should not need to ask for such a permittance, just as I don't need to for any other computing device I own (desktops, laptops, etc.)

    Thus preventing hundreds of thousands of tech support calls from the average idiot trying to mess with some system file (s)he has no business messing with..
    That is no excuse for taking away the right to retain full control over what I own.

    Apple's business/tech/security models are sound and part of what's made them the most successful consumer electronics company in the history of the world.
    That doesn't make it right.

  22. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by uri8472 View Post
    They may not have taken full control of the device, but they do force the install process of the OS to seek permission from them in order to proceed. That is a problem. As the owner of the device, only I should not need to ask for such a permittance, just as I don't need to for any other computing device I own (desktops, laptops, etc.)

    That is no excuse for taking away the right to retain full control over what I own.

    That doesn't make it right.
    Agree to disagree..

  23. #39
    So it begins.


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  25. #40
    Quote Originally Posted by NewD View Post
    Agree to disagree..
    Let me ask you something. For how long would you tolerate someone from a furniture company coming to your house, who will not allow you to bring in a piece of their furniture which you had fully purchased into your home without their agent first approving it? I'd be surprised if anyone would allow this or think that it was in any way acceptable for any company to conduct themselves in this manner. Am I wrong? True, once the sofa or recliner is in your house you can do with it as you please, but that still wouldn't excuse such a gross intrusion, would it?

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