Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 21 to 33 of 33

Your favorite Apple, iPhone, iPad, iOS, Jailbreak, and Cydia site.


Thread: T-Mobile Unveils 'Un-Carrier 4.0' Initiative at CES14

  1. #21
    Quote Originally Posted by pulsecub View Post
    I worked for Apple up until about 2 months ago. Sometime last fall, T-Mobile was starting to close down access to their network for anyone using an unlocked (factory or otherwise) iPhone. This was a planned phase-out that began the day they started officially carrying the iPhone. If you buy a new iPhone, and it is not specifically for T-Mobile's network, there is a chance it will not work properly on their network.
    Interesting comment pulsecub, but I would bet my mother-in-law's life you're wrong. Carriers never block access to unlocked phones unless the IMEI is flagged as bad (through non-payment or, more rarely, reported theft). T-Mobile want more subscribers and a move like this would lose them huge numbers of existing iPhone customers.

    You're right that some OLDER iPhones won't work properly onT-Mobile's network, because they might not support the AWS 1700 MHz UMTS band that T-Mobile uses in the US for 4G HSPA+ 42. They'll sill work, but you might only get EDGE data. But if you buy a new phone (5c or 5s) from ANY US carrier, it will work just fine with all T-Mobile's US frequencies, as long as it isn't carrier locked.

  2. #22
    Quote Originally Posted by csglinux View Post
    Interesting comment pulsecub, but I would bet my mother-in-law's life you're wrong. Carriers never block access to unlocked phones unless the IMEI is flagged as bad (through non-payment or, more rarely, reported theft). T-Mobile want more subscribers and a move like this would lose them huge numbers of existing iPhone customers.

    You're right that some OLDER iPhones won't work properly onT-Mobile's network, because they might not support the AWS 1700 MHz UMTS band that T-Mobile uses in the US for 4G HSPA+ 42. They'll sill work, but you might only get EDGE data. But if you buy a new phone (5c or 5s) from ANY US carrier, it will work just fine with all T-Mobile's US frequencies, as long as it isn't carrier locked.
    I can only tell you what I know from my own personal experience. One of my customers, who had purchased a factory unlocked GSM iPhone 5 from me, came back shortly after T-Mobile began carrying the phones locked to their network. She was dropping a lot of calls, and was unable to get a reliable data connection. I was small-device certified (which means I could take iPhone/iPad/iPod appointments at the Genius Bar), so I ran diagnostics on the device and didn't turn up any issues. Out of curiosity, I put my own AT&T SIM into her phone and tried making a call and surfing the Web, and had no problems with either. So, after putting her SIM back in the phone, rebooting it, then resetting the network settings, then ultimately installing a fresh copy of iOS, the problems persisted. At that point, we went down to the corporate T-Mobile store in our mall and talked to a guy there who told us they were starting to restrict access to their network; if the phone was not locked to T-Mobile, they could not guarantee it would work on their network. Essentially it was all part of a balancing act for the "un-carrier" initiative: they needed to make back the money they were losing on two-year contracts by forcing subscribers to buy carrier-locked phones, and the only way to do that was to start restricting access to their network for unlocked phones.

    My customer was really angry to hear this. I knew because of the time elapsed there was nothing under Apple's return policy we could do to help her. After some extended 'negotiation' (begging and pleading, really), the T-Mobile guy offered to swap out her phone for a carrier-locked model, and ultimately she left happy, and I learned something I'd use to prevent future customers from going through this situation.

  3. #23
    Quote Originally Posted by pulsecub View Post
    I can only tell you what I know from my own personal experience. One of my customers, who had purchased a factory unlocked GSM iPhone 5 from me, came back shortly after T-Mobile began carrying the phones locked to their network. She was dropping a lot of calls, and was unable to get a reliable data connection. I was small-device certified (which means I could take iPhone/iPad/iPod appointments at the Genius Bar), so I ran diagnostics on the device and didn't turn up any issues. Out of curiosity, I put my own AT&T SIM into her phone and tried making a call and surfing the Web, and had no problems with either. So, after putting her SIM back in the phone, rebooting it, then resetting the network settings, then ultimately installing a fresh copy of iOS, the problems persisted. At that point, we went down to the corporate T-Mobile store in our mall and talked to a guy there who told us they were starting to restrict access to their network; if the phone was not locked to T-Mobile, they could not guarantee it would work on their network. Essentially it was all part of a balancing act for the "un-carrier" initiative: they needed to make back the money they were losing on two-year contracts by forcing subscribers to buy carrier-locked phones, and the only way to do that was to start restricting access to their network for unlocked phones.

    My customer was really angry to hear this. I knew because of the time elapsed there was nothing under Apple's return policy we could do to help her. After some extended 'negotiation' (begging and pleading, really), the T-Mobile guy offered to swap out her phone for a carrier-locked model, and ultimately she left happy, and I learned something I'd use to prevent future customers from going through this situation.
    Thanks for the details pulsecub. I think I can explain exactly what was going on here.

    1) The guy in the T-Mobile store was either incorrect or misunderstood. What he meant to say, or perhaps tried to say, is that an iPhone not bought from T-Mobile couldn't be guaranteed to work 100% reliably on their network. This is true, because certain frequencies were not supported by older iPhones.
    2) The reason you had no problems with your AT&T SIM is that all GSM iPhone 5 models support all AT&T frequencies.
    3) Your customer had an original iPhone 5 model. The original iPhone 5 never supported the 1700 MHz band used by T-Mobile, so the T-Mobile rep's comments and your customer's experiences are consistent - all the customer would see with a T-Mobile SIM in that iPhone is a poor (and possibly weak) EDGE signal, with crappy data transfer rates.
    4) The T-Mobile rep swapped this iPhone out for an iPhone that DOES support the 1700 MHz band. All later model Apple iPhone 5 A1428 factory unlocked GSM iPhones support the 1700 MHz band too, so your customer would never have had this issue with a later model iPhone 5.
    5) If your customer's iPhone had been blocked from the T-Mobile network, they wouldn't have been able to do anything - no data and no calls at all.

    Any US carrier's iPhone 5c or 5s (or newer A1428 iPhone 5 models) will work just fine with all T-Mobile's frequencies, as long as the phone has not been carrier locked to somebody else or had its IMEI blacklisted.

  4. #24
    Quote Originally Posted by buggsy2 View Post
    AT&T pricing sux, but isn't their and Verizon's coverage much better than T-Mo or Sprint? So unless your specific usage area gets good coverage by T-Mo, there's still no incentive to switch.
    TMO and Sprint both have god awful coverage. Even if they offered me free service I wouldn't switch.

  5. #25
    Quote Originally Posted by csglinux View Post
    Thanks for the details pulsecub. I think I can explain exactly what was going on here.

    1) The guy in the T-Mobile store was either incorrect or misunderstood. What he meant to say, or perhaps tried to say, is that an iPhone not bought from T-Mobile couldn't be guaranteed to work 100% reliably on their network. This is true, because certain frequencies were not supported by older iPhones.
    2) The reason you had no problems with your AT&T SIM is that all GSM iPhone 5 models support all AT&T frequencies.
    3) Your customer had an original iPhone 5 model. The original iPhone 5 never supported the 1700 MHz band used by T-Mobile, so the T-Mobile rep's comments and your customer's experiences are consistent - all the customer would see with a T-Mobile SIM in that iPhone is a poor (and possibly weak) EDGE signal, with crappy data transfer rates.
    4) The T-Mobile rep swapped this iPhone out for an iPhone that DOES support the 1700 MHz band. All later model Apple iPhone 5 A1428 factory unlocked GSM iPhones support the 1700 MHz band too, so your customer would never have had this issue with a later model iPhone 5.
    5) If your customer's iPhone had been blocked from the T-Mobile network, they wouldn't have been able to do anything - no data and no calls at all.

    Any US carrier's iPhone 5c or 5s (or newer A1428 iPhone 5 models) will work just fine with all T-Mobile's frequencies, as long as the phone has not been carrier locked to somebody else or had its IMEI blacklisted.
    Let me try this one more time:

    My customer had a factory unlocked iPhone 5C, meaning it was not an "original iPhone 5 model" because all the original models were locked to AT&T, Verizon and/or Sprint. When the factory unlocked phones eventually came out, our store's T-Mobile rep (whose job it is to help us understand their network and plans so we can sell more of their services) met with us at the store and told us the factory unlocked phones would work on their network, which they did. Then, a few months later, T-Mobile announced they were getting the iPhone 5 for sale in their stores. Shortly after that is when the symptoms started showing up.

    Having said this, I will add that I understand what you are saying and don't need you to re-hash it again; just as I won't be returning to this thread any longer. I've spoken from my first-hand experience and interactions with T-Mobile corporate personnel (as opposed to resellers, who are only interested in their spiffs), and I'm not interested in an argument. You are welcome to believe what you like, just as I will. In the end, caveat emptor, let the buyer beware, so to anyone thinking of switching carriers, ask lots of questions before you make the move.

    Quote Originally Posted by xclusiveiphone View Post
    TMO and Sprint both have god awful coverage. Even if they offered me free service I wouldn't switch.
    That's why I've stayed with AT&T since 1998.
    Last edited by pulsecub; 2014-01-12 at 05:53 AM.

  6. #26
    Quote Originally Posted by xclusiveiphone View Post
    TMO and Sprint both have god awful coverage. Even if they offered me free service I wouldn't switch.
    It's all relative. Sure AT&T and Verizon have the biggest coverage, but if T-Mobile or any other provider has as good as, or better coverage in your area, and it's cheaper, why not go with them? I did my homework with T-Mobile, and it has great coverage in my area, both at home and school.

  7. #27
    So after a week, AT&T FINALLY got around to unlocking my iPhone 5. I can verify that my ORIGINAL iPhone that I bought on release is working perfectly on T-Mobile. Calls, 4G LTE Data, Visual Voicemail, MMS, everything. Between home and school, I get good/great coverage and speeds are pretty damn good. I'm getting between 16-20 Mbps downloads, uploads, are like 1 Mbps at home, that's kind of a let down, but then again, I don't do too many uploads other than FB/IG posts.

    Overall, I'm a happy camper. I'm saving a lil over $30 a month with truly unlimited everything on T-Mobile. With my discount, my monthly bill is gonna be like $59, compared to at least $89 with AT&T.

  8. #28
    Quote Originally Posted by pulsecub View Post
    Let me try this one more time:

    My customer had a factory unlocked iPhone 5C, meaning it was not an "original iPhone 5 model" because all the original models were locked to AT&T, Verizon and/or Sprint. When the factory unlocked phones eventually came out, our store's T-Mobile rep (whose job it is to help us understand their network and plans so we can sell more of their services) met with us at the store and told us the factory unlocked phones would work on their network, which they did. Then, a few months later, T-Mobile announced they were getting the iPhone 5 for sale in their stores. Shortly after that is when the symptoms started showing up.

    Having said this, I will add that I understand what you are saying and don't need you to re-hash it again; just as I won't be returning to this thread any longer. I've spoken from my first-hand experience and interactions with T-Mobile corporate personnel (as opposed to resellers, who are only interested in their spiffs), and I'm not interested in an argument. You are welcome to believe what you like, just as I will. In the end, caveat emptor, let the buyer beware, so to anyone thinking of switching carriers, ask lots of questions before you make the move.
    Your first post clearly stated "iPhone 5", not "iPhone 5C". The T-Mobile 5C = AT&T 5C = unlocked GSM 5C. Other than the factory locking, they are the exact same phone. The only way a 5C wouldn't work on T-Mobile is 1) it was defective or 2) somebody hadn't paid their bill and it had its IMEI blacklisted. T-Mobile does not and has never blocked unlocked GSM phones from their networks.

    You're entitled to believe in the pixies if you want to, just as I am entitled to point out that you're spreading silly misinformation around on this forum.
    Last edited by csglinux; 2014-01-18 at 02:04 AM.

  9. #29
    Green Apple
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Wisconsin
    Posts
    84
    Thanks
    33
    Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts

    Anybody have insight into whether there is still a federal employee discount and if so, what parts of the bill it applies to? Or since my iPhone 5 is fine do I just pay my ATT cancellation fee and can use that and get it unlocked without buying a new one? I don't like the stick the phone price on your bill part.

    edit: yeah, no. Unless I'm missing something while it may be $10 cheaper a month you still have to buy a full priced phone and turn in your current device to be eligible?
    Last edited by darwina; 2014-01-19 at 04:31 AM.

  10. #30
    Default Got 3 unlocked iphones all on T-Mob
    I don't know why Pulsecub might believe that. I'll give the benefit of the doubt and figure he is either misinformed or is retelling something that someone else said. I recognized he said i5 and then it was i5C. Oh well.

    I have a 3GS, a 4S and a 5 in my family. They are all unlocked (the first 2 from AT&T, the 5 was an Apple direct purchase). They are all on T-Mobile and I have no issues whatsoever. The 3GS was, I believe, a software unlock (not the Gevey SIM adapter and not an IMEI unlock); the 4S was an IMEI unlock.

    @Pulsecub - The GSM phones are the same. When you purchase one in Europe, they are not likely to be locked. And those phones, predominantly GSM models, will work the same as the ones in North America from AT&T, T-Mobile, Rogers, Bell Canada, Telus, SaskTel Canada, Telcel Mexico, Mobilicity Canada, Videotron Canada, and WIND Mobile Canada. If it's unlocked, meaning that the IMEI is off a list of "not your phone," it will authenticate with any of these companies SIM cards.




    Quote Originally Posted by csglinux View Post
    Your first post clearly stated "iPhone 5", not "iPhone 5C". The T-Mobile 5C = AT&T 5C = unlocked GSM 5C. Other than the factory locking, they are the exact same phone. The only way a 5C wouldn't work on T-Mobile is 1) it was defective or 2) somebody hadn't paid their bill and it had its IMEI blacklisted. T-Mobile does not and has never blocked unlocked GSM phones from their networks.

    You're entitled to believe in the pixies if you want to, just as I am entitled to point out that you're spreading silly misinformation around on this forum.

  11. #31
    Quote Originally Posted by webpager View Post
    @Pulsecub - The GSM phones are the same. When you purchase one in Europe, they are not likely to be locked. And those phones, predominantly GSM models, will work the same as the ones in North America from AT&T, T-Mobile, Rogers, Bell Canada, Telus, SaskTel Canada, Telcel Mexico, Mobilicity Canada, Videotron Canada, and WIND Mobile Canada. If it's unlocked, meaning that the IMEI is off a list of "not your phone," it will authenticate with any of these companies SIM cards.
    @Webpager: I am neither confused or misinformed. I worked for Apple selling these phones, so I had to know the difference. Yes, you are correct that if you buy one of these phones in EUROPE, they are not locked unless Apple in those countries has agreements with the service providers that require them to lock the phones. However, in the United States, the carriers do require the phones be locked to their unique frequencies for a period of time starting immediately when the phone is released and continuing on for usually a few months afterward. Eventually, factory-unlocked phones are released in the US, and those should work on whatever carrier is chosen so long as the wireless technology is compatible. However, our T-Mobile Corporate representative, who trained us, told us that non-locked phones might be "discriminated against" on their data network. Their official position was if you were going to use T-Mobile as your service provider, buy a "T-Mobile" phone, and not an "unlocked" phone. And honestly, that was my experience in the store with customers: Folks who had unlocked phones would complain about Internet-related issues on their phones, where previously, there were none.

  12. #32
    Then the T-Mobile rep lied to you outright and you had a couple of customers that didn't realize they could not use internet data and the phone at the same time as they can on AT&T's network.

    Except for the very first I5 models which were "frequency challenged" they are ALL THE SAME. I moved my 3GS, bought when it first came out, from AT&T, to T-Mobile as soon as the 1 year (yes, 1 year, not 2) contract was completed. I did the same with the 4S. The 5 was purchased about 2 months after it was released directly from Apple as an UNLOCKED model. I spoke to a T-Mobile rep today, who is in new customer aquisition (likely a better term for outside sales rep). She's been with the company in the same position for 6 years. I was helping her with her personal laptop, getting connected at a Starbucks. I asked if she'd heard anything about the issue - she stated, after checking back her TM intranet, that T-Mobile has always had a BRING YOUR OWN HANDSET policy.

    If you're encouraging people to bring their own handset, I don't think they want to lock some out. She was discouraged at the new "give us your handset, buy one of ours and we'll pay off your early term fee" program.

  13. #33
    Wrong and wrong. No one ever said anything about talking and using data at the same time on the T-Mobile network. I certainly never did. And yes, T-Mobile did have a bring your own handset policy, which they have modified now to a trade that handset in for a dedicated T-Mobile handset policy since they've gone completely contract-free.

    Honestly, I don't know why you want to be so argumentative. You don't have to believe what I'm telling you. I am completely sure in the information I have because I've worked directly with T-Mobile corporate folks both in sales and in technical support. You are apparently completely sure in the information you have from your Outside Sales Rep. So, how 'bout we just leave it at that and call it a day, eh? Arguing back and forth is not productive, and I'm really not interested in continuing to hash this out any longer.

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Posting Permissions
  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •