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  • Apple Accused of Violating Patented Wi-Fi Technologies by CalTech
    The patent system is a catalyst for litigation, and Apple is no stranger to these situations. The latest accusation comes from the California Institute of Technology, or CalTech.


    As reported by MacRumors, CalTech’s patents that relate to this particular case were submitted between the years 2006 and 2012, and focus on IRA/LDPC codes. They use simpler coding and decoding circuitry that’s meant to improve overall data transmission performance and rates. Those same technologies are currently implemented within the 802.11n and 802.11ac Wi-Fi standards, of which are used in many Apple products.

    The formal complaint against Apple was placed in the U.S. District Court for Central California. It reads that Apple’s products, including some iPhone, iPad, Mac, and even Apple Watch models use the IRA/LDPC encoders and/or decoders, which CalTech says means that Apple is infringing on four patents.

    “Apple manufactures, uses, imports, offers for sale, and/or sells Wi-Fi products that incorporate IRA/LDPC encoders and/or decoders and infringe the Asserted Patents. Apple products that incorporate IRA/LDPC encoders and/or decoders and infringe the Asserted Patents include, but are not limited to, the following: iPhone SE, iPhone 6s, iPhone 6s Plus, iPhone 6, iPhone 6 Plus, iPhone 5c, iPhone 5s, iPhone 5, iPad Air, iPad Air 2, iPad Pro, iPad Mini 4, iPad Mini 3, iPad Mini 2, MacBook Air [and] Apple Watch.”
    Within the same suit, CalTech is also naming Broadcom as a company that’s also infringing on the same patents. That would make sense, considering Broadcom is one of Apple’s main suppliers for Wi-Fi chips, which do indeed support 802.11ac. Those chips are installed a variety of Apple’s most popular mobile products, and are also included in the Retina MacBook Pro, the MacBook Air, and iMac lineup.

    “Apple is one of Broadcom’s largest customers. In 2012, 2013 and 2014, sales to Apple represented 14.6%, 13.3% and 14.0% of Broadcom Corp.’s net revenue, respectively. […] During this timeframe, Broadcom’s Wi-Fi products that incorporate IRA/LDPC encoders and decoders and infringe the Asserted Patents were incorporated into Apple’s key products including iPhones, iPads, and Mac computers. […] Broadcom and Apple are jointly and severally liable for infringement of the Asserted Patents.”
    [via MacRumors]
    This article was originally published in forum thread: Apple Accused of Violating Patented Wi-Fi Technologies by CalTech started by Caiden Spencer View original post
    Comments 5 Comments
    1. Norb's Avatar
      Norb -
      Such an obvious patent troll. Wait years for tech to be used before filing lawsuit. Sues company which has most money (apple) and not broadcom who made and sold the product to Apple. How does that even make sense?

      Why would I sue the customers of the person who violated my patent and not the person who violated my patent?
    1. WHUDS's Avatar
      WHUDS -
      Hmm did they steal? (Apple) or did they not? I think its that simple. Apple sues when they think someone else has stolen from them. Its the reasons for patents
    1. SpiderManAPV's Avatar
      SpiderManAPV -
      Quote Originally Posted by WHUDS View Post
      Hmm did they steal? (Apple) or did they not? I think its that simple. Apple sues when they think someone else has stolen from them. Its the reasons for patents
      IANAL, but it seems to me that Broadcom stole the tech and Apple buys Broadcom chips. If that’s true I don’t understand how you can sue Apple. Sue Broadcom? Sure. Apple? I don’t understand how.
    1. vinaygoel2000's Avatar
      vinaygoel2000 -
      Quote Originally Posted by SpiderManAPV View Post
      IANAL, but it seems to me that Broadcom stole the tech and Apple buys Broadcom chips. If that’s true I don’t understand how you can sue Apple. Sue Broadcom? Sure. Apple? I don’t understand how.
      As an example, if something goes wrong with my building, I sue the engineer, architect, contractor, city, county, etc. I let the judge decide who is at fault. So you can technically sue anyone you want. What the court decides is another ball game.
    1. WHUDS's Avatar
      WHUDS -
      Quote Originally Posted by SpiderManAPV View Post
      IANAL, but it seems to me that Broadcom stole the tech and Apple buys Broadcom chips. If that’s true I don’t understand how you can sue Apple. Sue Broadcom? Sure. Apple? I don’t understand how.
      Yes I agree sue Broadcom then