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  • [POLL] Should Apple create a backdoor solution for the FBI?


    Apple to argue First Amendment rights in FBI decryption battle

    According to a report from the Associated Press, Apple plans to file legal papers in which it will argue that its fight with the FBI of decrypting an iPhone used by one of the San Bernardino gunmen should be settled by Congress. This report follows Apple CEO Tim Cook’s letter to employees in which he stated that the government should withdraw its demands because they are invalid under the All Writs Act from 1789.


    Theodore Boutrous Jr., a lead lawyer for Apple, reportedly previewed the company’s legal plan and arguments to the Associated Press, much of which Cook hinted at in his open-letter to customers and subsequent letter to employees. Apple will argue that the fight should be decided by Congress, where it spent $5 billion lobbying in 2015.

    Boutrous echoed Tim Cook’s sentiments while speaking to the AP, explaining that the law does not give the government the authority to force companies to create a backdoor to their devices:

    “The government is really seeking to push the courts to do what they haven’t been able to persuade Congress to do,” Boutrous said in an AP interview. “That’s to give it more broad, sweeping authority to help the Department of Justice hack into devices, to have a backdoor into devices, and the law simply does not provide that authority.”
    Yesterday it was revealed that in addition to the San Bernardino case, the government is seeking data from at least 12 other iPhones involved in criminal activities. Apple will argue against all of these cases with this battle, the report claims.

    Apple’s battle with the FBI over national security versus user privacy began last week and has since become one of the biggest and most complex stories in tech and politics.

    Let us know in the poll. Click here for the poll
    This article was originally published in forum thread: [POLL] Should Apple create a backdoor solution for the FBI? started by Caiden Spencer View original post
    Comments 54 Comments
    1. Ben193's Avatar
      Ben193 -
      Apple is right, period
    1. jaimeloz's Avatar
      jaimeloz -
      Nope.
    1. Albut's Avatar
      Albut -
      Apple have s duty to help protect all of us from terrorism and this they should put above making excessive amount of money. If they have a conscience then they must.
    1. dsg's Avatar
      dsg -
      No, this will have much bigger repercussions if they do it.

      Edit: one iPhone that was not destroyed with the rest of the phones, it belongs to the state and issued as a work phone; this is tenuous at best when helping defend against terrorism.

      Edit: they already have a big list of suspected terorist. why are they not taking action and start being preventive rather than having to deal with the aftermath

      War on Terrorism, not at all; it's more a secret war on erroding personal privacy and civil liberties
    1. spinal_cord's Avatar
      spinal_cord -
      I was on the fence for a while about this, but the FBI aren't asking Apple to unlock the phone, which I would side with the FBI on, but they are demanding the ability to unlock any phone themselves, give a man a fish etc. Which I am against.
    1. dsg's Avatar
      dsg -
      but the FBI aren't asking Apple to unlock the phone, which I would side with the FBI on
      I'd still say no
    1. peacedog's Avatar
      peacedog -
      Quote Originally Posted by spinal_cord View Post
      but the FBI aren't asking Apple to unlock the phone, which I would side with the FBI on
      If Apple unlocks it once, they will repeatedly be asked to unlock over-and-over again. And would the FBI ask only for terrorism case? Murder? Drug trafficking? Smoking a little weed? Parking ticket? Where do you draw the line?
    1. tridley68's Avatar
      tridley68 -
      Apple should not create any back doors period stick to your guns Apple
    1. exNavy's Avatar
      exNavy -
      I think the poll question should be should the FBI crack the terrorist's phone? Answer: Yes. Don't make a backdoor on everyone else though.
    1. King_O_Hill's Avatar
      King_O_Hill -
      Quote Originally Posted by dsg View Post

      War on Terrorism, not at all; it's more a secret war on erroding personal privacy and civil liberties
      This is the real reason they want this!

      "When you sacrifice a small amount of Liberty for security, you deserve neither liberty or security" - Ben Franklin

      Quote Originally Posted by Albut View Post
      Apple have s duty to help protect all of us from terrorism and this they should put above making excessive amount of money. If they have a conscience then they must.
      Apple has no such responsibility to protect us from terrorism! They are a tech company in business to make money. Protecting us is the job of the FBI etc, maybe next time the FBI won't order the passcode be changed.

      So not only no, but hell no!!!
    1. Ben193's Avatar
      Ben193 -
      all of us. or many of us. are sad of what happened in the terrorist attack. but, come on? risking all of our privacy. seriously? we have our rights.
    1. csglinux's Avatar
      csglinux -
      There's no happy outcome here. Either way, the terrorists have won :-(
    1. jonathan1683's Avatar
      jonathan1683 -
      1. Apple should not have the technology to reverse engineer the phone or break the encryption. It defeats the purpose of security in the first place.
      2. Apple should help saves lives from terrorists and aid the FBI.
      3. Apple already got requests from drug related cases to break into phones not just this case.


      Here you have it, an unsolvable problem.
    1. King_O_Hill's Avatar
      King_O_Hill -
      Why should Apple help save lives?

      They are a tech company not a government agency.
    1. valkraider's Avatar
      valkraider -
      What if it were a home instead of a phone?

      Everyone agrees we should certainly let the authorities search a criminals or terrorists home...

      But would we give them the keys to everyone else's home to do so?

      Should they have the keys to your home or my home too?
    1. unison999's Avatar
      unison999 -
      Are there no hackers in the world that can do this in a case by case basis?
      I say no on global key to unlock phones, but yes on on helping government crack a phone with a court order.
    1. kelkel5313's Avatar
      kelkel5313 -
      NO!
    1. ewa_123's Avatar
      ewa_123 -
      Yes they shouldn't protect terrorists! Only in such situations where there's danger from terrorism, not in other cases. Security and health, lives are more important than privacy if terrorists

      Life is poker, risk being happy
    1. csglinux's Avatar
      csglinux -
      Quote Originally Posted by ewa_123 View Post
      Yes they shouldn't protect terrorists! Only in such situations where there's danger from terrorism, not in other cases. Security and health, lives are more important than privacy.
      Superficially, this seems obvious, but there's a fundamental problem being overlooked here. US government legislation cannot uninvent prime numbers. Encryption exists and is here to stay. ISIS allegedly uses Telegram (which is made in Germany and so beyond US jurisdiction) but they'd also have the option of using any other (even homebrew) encryption.

      The outcome of all this is likely to be that everyday law-abiding citizens are going to have their privacy and civil liberties eroded, while determined terrorists are going to be able to continue to hide behind encryption. This is really the worst of both scenarios.
    1. mrweezysopus's Avatar
      mrweezysopus -
      Quote Originally Posted by Albut View Post
      Apple have s duty to help protect all of us from terrorism and this they should put above making excessive amount of money. If they have a conscience then they must.

      That is ridiculous. Let me guess, you are one of those "If you aren't doing anything wrong, you have nothing to worry about" type people.