• Your favorite

    Apple

    ,

    iPhone

    ,

    iPad

    ,

    iOS

    ,
    Jailbreak
    , and
    Cydia
    site.
  • McAfee offers to decrypt iPhone 5c used by San Bernardino Terrorists
    .
    Software developer John McAfee criticized the FBI on Thursday for attempting to force Apple to build a backdoor to access data from a terrorist's iPhone, saying that he will decrypt the handset himself for free.



    McAfee, an eccentric millionaire who is currently vying for presidential nomination from the Libertarian Party , believes that he and his team could hack into the iPhone in question without the need for a new, insecure version of iOS to be built by Apple.

    The former antivirus creator believes his team would be able to decrypt the information from the iPhone 5c at the center of the case within three weeks. He believes they will be able to unlock the iPhone "primarily" with social engineering.

    McAfee argued that allowing him to unlock the iPhone free of charge will negate the need for Apple to go down a dangerous path, building a backdoor into iOS to allow access to investigators.

    "If the government succeeds in getting this back door, it will eventually get a back door into all encryption, and our world, as we know it, is over," he wrote. "In spite of the FBI's claim that it would protect the back door, we all know that's impossible. There are bad apples everywhere, and there only needs to be in the US government."
    McAfee's confidence that his team could crack the iPhone is based on the fact that he does not believe the FBI would hire the type of people he works with. Specifically, he described "prodigies" who sport mohawk haircuts, ear piercings, tattooed faces, and one person "who demands to smoke weed while working and won't work for less than a half-million dollars a year."

    "I would eat my shoe on the Neil Cavuto show if we could not break the encryption on the San Bernardino phone," McAfee wrote. "This is a pure and simple fact."
    On Tuesday, a federal judge ordered Apple to comply with FBI requests for assistance in unlocking an encrypted iPhone 5c used by San Bernardino shooter Syed Ryzwan Farook. Law enforcement technicians are looking to facilitate a brute force attack, but need specialized software capable of bypassing iOS 9's passcode counter.

    Apple CEO Tim Cook took immediate action, vowing to fight government calls for privileged hardware access in a letter posted to his company's website just hours after the order came down. For Cook, the issue has implications far beyond a single iPhone, an argument floated by the White House on Wednesday.


    Original Source
    This article was originally published in forum thread: McAfee offers to decrypt iPhone 5c used by San Bernardino Terrorists started by Caiden Spencer View original post
    Comments 10 Comments
    1. vinaygoel2000's Avatar
      vinaygoel2000 -
      If he is waiting to do it for free, what is he waiting for? Can't he borrow an iPhone 5C from one of his weed smoking employees and crack the 6 digit alphanumeric passcode? Then tell FBI that they already did it. Obviously they'll have to do it again for the terrorist phone but at least FBI will know that it's already been done.
    1. iBwizzle's Avatar
      iBwizzle -
      Call me a conspirator but you want to know why they want you to have a lock on your phone so only you can open it and the government can't?

      They want you to feel that you're the only one who has the key to it so when they hack it through wifi and put evidence related to a crime (terrorism, rape, w.e.) then there is no way for you to say that someone set you up. Only you can open it, remember?

      They don't need to open it through your password. They already have the power to hack it and replace the data on your phone without you even knowing. The trick is to make you think that you are in control and feel safe enough to store your information on apple and android products. Not all government agencies can do this, but the ones that really run **** have the power.

      They stopped making phones you can take the battery out of so that they can trace you and access your phone even when your phone is off. They can control it and push data into it and change your **** without you even needing to unlock it.
    1. ctcnsf's Avatar
      ctcnsf -
      Quote Originally Posted by iBwizzle View Post
      Call me a conspirator but you want to know why they want you to have a lock on your phone so only you can open it and the government can't?

      They want you to feel that you're the only one who has the key to it so when they hack it through wifi and put evidence related to a crime (terrorism, rape, w.e.) then there is no way for you to say that someone set you up. Only you can open it, remember?

      They don't need to open it through your password. They already have the power to hack it and replace the data on your phone without you even knowing. The trick is to make you think that you are in control and feel safe enough to store your information on apple and android products. Not all government agencies can do this, but the ones that really run **** have the power.

      They stopped making phones you can take the battery out of so that they can trace you and access your phone even when your phone is off. They can control it and push data into it and change your **** without you even needing to unlock it.
      Attachment 722481
    1. VOLTAGExDT's Avatar
      VOLTAGExDT -
      Ya
      But see I have aluminum foil as a hat so…
    1. StarkCity's Avatar
      StarkCity -
      This whole thing isn't even about getting into that particular phone. By passing a passcode isn't news..... It can be done, it just wouldn't be admissible in court if the FBI broke laws to acquire the Intel..... Hence the request for help not only to access that particular phone, but with further 'help' in creating a government accessible back door into iOS devices..... If the phone was an android it wouldn't even be news.
    1. maaaslo's Avatar
      maaaslo -
      Quote Originally Posted by ctcnsf View Post


      I think he should stop smoking that crap too...
    1. oneduality's Avatar
      oneduality -
      Quote Originally Posted by iBwizzle View Post
      Call me a conspirator .......
      Ok, I will..you're a conspirator ..
    1. Silvio6's Avatar
      Silvio6 -
      Quote Originally Posted by vinaygoel2000 View Post
      Can't he borrow an iPhone 5C from one of his weed smoking employees and crack the 6 digit alphanumeric passcode? Then tell FBI that they already did it.
      Good point, I totally agree.

      I am wondering, can the data be copied encrypted ? I mean, this will not auto destruct if copied, right ? I'm sure someone has the tools to copy a memory chip, even if encrypted ? Then try to crack it etc..
    1. Tupring's Avatar
      Tupring -
      Quote Originally Posted by vinaygoel2000 View Post
      If he is waiting to do it for free, what is he waiting for? Can't he borrow an iPhone 5C from one of his weed smoking employees and crack the 6 digit alphanumeric passcode? Then tell FBI that they already did it. Obviously they'll have to do it again for the terrorist phone but at least FBI will know that it's already been done.
      Assuming he's even using 6-digits… Good luck FBI! How to Create a More Secure Passcode on Your iPhone or iPad - Mac Rumors
    1. Darkflame's Avatar
      Darkflame -
      Quote Originally Posted by Silvio6 View Post
      Good point, I totally agree.

      I am wondering, can the data be copied encrypted ? I mean, this will not auto destruct if copied, right ? I'm sure someone has the tools to copy a memory chip, even if encrypted ? Then try to crack it etc..
      I would think so. Purchase the exact same model. Desolder the memory chips. Rip the encrypted data. Put the chips in a socket and run a ribbon to the board. Punch in a passcode. Get an error. Read the chips again. See what flags changed. Byte compare etc. rinse and repeat. If you fail and nuke then just rewrite the backup back to the memory chip and you are back to your starting point. If you do a byte compare and see only a little sector of data changes. Just test PINS and rewrite that single sector. Would be better to interface a NVRAM in place of the flash chips cause you're going to do a lot of rewrites. Problem is this method will take a thousand times longer than if Apple did the work themselves. Apple knows the ins and out of the iOS. They can get in if they want to. They are just afraid of the public smear it will put on their company if they did.