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  • BlackBerry CEO Takes an Indirect Shot at Apple


    Proving once again that BlackBerry usually makes headlines these days primarily when it's bashing Apple, this evening the CEO of BlackBerry took off the gloves and took aim at Apple (without ever mentioning Apple), generating headlines in response to the embattled Canadian smartphone maker's claims.

    Although BlackBerry chief John Chen went after an array of companies in his blog post, his comments affiliated with Apple are provoking the most chatter Thursday. His beef? Apple's data security and privacy policies.

    "For years, government officials have pleaded to the technology industry for help yet have been met with disdain," Chen writes. "In fact, one of the world’s most powerful tech companies recently refused a lawful access request in an investigation of a known drug dealer because doing so would 'substantially tarnish the brand' of the company."

    The company he is referring to, of course, is Apple.

    "We are indeed in a dark place when companies put their reputations above the greater good," Chen says, before talking up BlackBerry as a company that understands "arguably more than any other large tech company" the importance of its "privacy commitment to product success and brand value."

    To read the full post by Chen, click here.

    Source: BlackBerry
    This article was originally published in forum thread: BlackBerry CEO Takes an Indirect Shot at Apple started by Michael Essany View original post
    Comments 1 Comment
    1. SuncoastDave's Avatar
      SuncoastDave -
      Well to note that John Chen's former company (Sybase) was very cozy indeed with the US government.

      Back in the day, one of their engineering types hinted at a very large database installation (Sybase IQ, for those who know dbs) for an unnamed 3 letter agency. I had personally assumed it sounded like a copy of the phone records from AT&T, etc. as I knew AT&T were using it. This is all 10 years+ before Snowdon's revelations. (Can't say they were a huge surprise either. The whole idea of detailed network analysis was out there in public for years, so it all added up.)