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  • California Rules May Put a Human in Apple's Smart Car


    Self-driving cars aren't exactly ready for a human-less test. That's the feeling of California regulators, it seems.

    According to a report Wednesday from Reuters, California has just issued draft rules for self-driving cars. And the requirements could have a big impact on how Apple ultimately tests the technology in the field.

    The rules would compel a licensed driver to be present inside the vehicle "in case of failure in a plan that stresses safety."

    The regulations by the Department of Motor Vehicles are intended to help nurture the state's nascent but fast-growing autonomous vehicle technology industry while allowing traditional car companies and new entrants like Alphabet Inc and Apple Inc to safely deploy their self-driving cars already in development.
    Of course, the rules aren't yet on the books. The proposal will be open for public comment before finalization. However, it's looking more and more like the proposal will be embraced, mandating a human touch in every smart car test on the open roads of California.

    Source: Reuters
    This article was originally published in forum thread: California Rules May Put a Human in Apple's Smart Car started by Michael Essany View original post
    Comments 3 Comments
    1. CabooseLoL's Avatar
      CabooseLoL -
      Oh god, the BMW i3 is hideous! Why is it so difficult for car companies (other than Tesla) to make good looking electric vehicles?
    1. StephenMarkLevi's Avatar
      StephenMarkLevi -
      Quote Originally Posted by CabooseLoL View Post
      Oh god, the BMW i3 is hideous! Why is it so difficult for car companies (other than Tesla) to make good looking electric vehicles?
      Google Porsche Mission E.
    1. quidam_brujah's Avatar
      quidam_brujah -
      One of the problems seems to be that designers are still tying themselves to the old paradigm: cabin design affected by bulky front/rear mounted engines, drivetrains and equipment placement. The other part of the problem is cost: the more of the legacy equipment, hardware, and fabrication gear they use, the lower the retooling costs. Tesla never had those so — they never had to deal with those aspects of 'mold breaking.'