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  • Candy Crush Developer Withdraws Trademark Filing for the word "Candy"


    The company behind the popular iOS game Candy Crush, King, has abandoned its controversial pursuit of ownership of the term “candy” in the US and has officially withdrawn its trademark application. The pulling of the application was first revealed by the folks over at Kotaku, which also received an official statement from King. The developer confirmed that the trademark filing was withdrawn after it obtained the rights to the name “Candy Crusher.” The company said the following regarding the matter:

    Each market that King operates in is different with regard to IP. We feel that having the rights to Candy Crusher is the best option for protecting Candy Crush in the U.S. market. This does not affect our E.U. trademark for Candy and we continue to take all appropriate steps to protect our IP.
    The popularity of Candy Crush and the perceived generic theme of King’s pursuit of the trademark for the word “candy” gained considerable attention earlier this year, with some expressing concern. King’s filing sought ownership of the word “candy” as it would relate to digital puzzle games and not necessarily other titles, such as the board game “Candy Land.” Following its purchase of the trademark for the word “candy” in Europe, King began sending cease-and-desist letters to smartphone game developers with apps using the word “candy,” as well as the word “saga,” which the company also owns the rights to. Among the games that received a letter was the developer of the game, Banner Saga, a popular viking-themed role playing game.

    In protest, independent game developers held a “game jam” creating candy-related games to bring attention to their concerns over King’s efforts. The so-called “candy jam” was held with the belief that “trademarking common words is ridiculous.” The theme of the event probably contributed some weight to King’s decision to withdraw the trademark filing which the company has withdrawn.

    Source: Kotaku
    This article was originally published in forum thread: Candy Crush Developer Withdraws Trademark Filing for the word "Candy" started by Akshay Masand View original post
    Comments 12 Comments
    1. ThatOneProfile's Avatar
      ThatOneProfile -
      I'm going to patent that word now. Thanks for the heads up.
    1. WHUDS's Avatar
      WHUDS -
      I patent the English words
      "Hello" and "Goodbye"
    1. Jahooba's Avatar
      Jahooba -
      Oh, thank goodness. What a bunch of jerks - It's so easy to make up words. Juhsparkle. There, a name for a new game. Bangoline. Churple. Those took less than ten seconds - there's no good excuse for taking 'candy' or 'crush'.
    1. *T*'s Avatar
      *T* -
      Kluse, Zblam, Trocxr, Splith, Baflok, Shonqs, Viddix. 7 world class names for apps.
    1. exNavy's Avatar
      exNavy -
      I don't know who started this but can the owners of Bejeweled sue candy crush for just using different icons in their game?
    1. saleen_GT's Avatar
      saleen_GT -
      Quote Originally Posted by exNavy View Post
      I don't know who started this but can the owners of Bejeweled sue candy crush for just using different icons in their game?
      U 100000000000% rite

      U r 100000000000% rite
    1. cmwade77's Avatar
      cmwade77 -
      Quote Originally Posted by exNavy View Post
      I don't know who started this but can the owners of Bejeweled sue candy crush for just using different icons in their game?
      That would be a patent based suit, not a trademark based suit, but I don't think so, because I believe Candy Crush makes enough changes in the game that it would be difficult to consider it a clone, but it could be considered a derivative work and depending on how long ago Bejweled was patented (if ever), this may be allowed under the law. Remember the whole point of patents is to provide a reasonable time that others can't profit from your work, so that you can recoup the investment you made and make a little profit. After that, the patents allow others to make derivative works based on your patents, this is done to encourage innovation to continue. At least this was the original premise of patents and what we should be aiming to continue doing.

      Trademarks register titles, words, etc. that might confuse people if another similar product started using them.

      Patents cover the actual inventions themselves.
    1. patoons's Avatar
      patoons -
      people have a problem with them trademarking the word candy meanwhile the devices we all love and use is from a company that trademarked the word apple...
    1. WithinTemptationFan's Avatar
      WithinTemptationFan -
      Quote Originally Posted by patoons View Post
      people have a problem with them trademarking the word candy meanwhile the devices we all love and use is from a company that trademarked the word apple...
      lol
    1. Perceptum's Avatar
      Perceptum -
      I am going to patent the word "patent".

      I am going to make millions!!!!
    1. Christophxr's Avatar
      Christophxr -
      I'm going to trademark "sue," "court," and "legal."
    1. Hubert Lucero's Avatar
      Hubert Lucero -
      That was a bad move from the developers of Candy Crush. Patenting words like these that are very commonly used will only bring resentment among the people. I am not against patenting, but trade name registrations and patenting should be done for unique names of the business not for words like Candy, Teddy etc.