+ Reply
Results 1 to 5 of 5

Your favorite Apple, iPhone, iPad, iOS, Jailbreak, and Cydia site.


Thread: Apple Blew It; Snow Leopard's Finder is Base-10

is a discussion within the

Snow Leopard 10.6

forums, a part of the

OS X

section;
Many people have been whining about the change of how file sizes are calculated in Snow Leopard, including me, but for different reasons. They think that Apple have been paid
...
  1. #1
    My iPhone is a Part of Me
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Posts
    639
    Thanks
    3
    Thanked 154 Times in 97 Posts

    Thumbs down Apple Blew It; Snow Leopard's Finder is Base-10
    Many people have been whining about the change of how file sizes are calculated in Snow Leopard, including me, but for different reasons. They think that Apple have been paid by hard disk manufacturers to report sizes in the fake marketing way instead of the proper way . People think that they are being cheated by hard drive manufacturers because their 400GB hard drive holds 360GB of data. Snow Leopard will report the hard drive size as 400GB. Apple have been sued by stupid users who do not comprehend the difference between base-10 and base-2 mathematics. Now, users say that the change in Snow Leopard should not have occurred to appease hard drive manufacturers because computers are binary. I have even seen some to argue that Snow Leopard costs $29 instead of $129 because hard disk manufactures have paid Apple the difference.

    The argument is flawed. Those that say that everything in computing is in base-2 are wrong. They say that because they have heard that computers are binary, 0 and 1, and were exposed to base-2 because operating systems have reported numbers in said base for almost half a century. Before they heard that computers are binary, they assumed that kilo meant 1000 and were shocked to learn that it meant 1024. Back in the day, it was easier and faster for computers to calculate in base-2. It stayed that way.

    The issue is not the numbers, but the prefixes that accompany said numbers. They should have never used SI prefixes for base-2 mathematics. 1024 is close enough to 1000, but it is not 1000. At the terabyte-size, the difference in base-2 and base-10 is 10%. People are whining that they have been cheated. Their new 1000GB hard drive is only 900GB. Apple have been sued. This is why they changed to the proper way of using the prefixes. As hard disks become larger and larger, more idiots will sue them. READ MORE!

  2. The Following User Says Thank You to SpookyET For This Useful Post:

    A Retired Mod (08-30-2009)

  3. #2
    Retired Moderator A Retired Mod's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Independence, LA
    Posts
    5,642
    Thanks
    656
    Thanked 765 Times in 592 Posts

    Thanks for the info.!

  4. #3
    Retired Moderator one1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    In my own little world
    Posts
    10,318
    Thanks
    349
    Thanked 1,180 Times in 730 Posts

    I gotta tell you........ I just don't care. I searched with spotlight, I reviewed thumbnails with previews, I clicked and held dock items for secondary menus until I was giddy with glee, but never did I search for every bit on my 360gb HD.
    Screw #Winning, I'm #Juanning
    iMac 27" i5 quad 2.8Ghz (1TB), MacBook Pro 17" 2.6, iPhone 4s

  5. #4
    Livin the iPhone Life
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    1,458
    Thanks
    15
    Thanked 197 Times in 184 Posts

    I'm actually glad apple made that change, and I hope that microsoft will follow.

    the way hard drive spaces were calculated under mac os and windows (and linux) are simply wrong. mac os x finally displays the size correctly. a 400GB hard drive IS actually 400GB (base 10). but mac os and windows have always shown GiB (base-2), but labeled it GB. snow leopard finally adresses this (strange) issue.

  6. #5
    My iPhone is a Part of Me
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Posts
    639
    Thanks
    3
    Thanked 154 Times in 97 Posts

    Quote Originally Posted by BlackWolf View Post
    I'm actually glad apple made that change, and I hope that microsoft will follow.

    the way hard drive spaces were calculated under mac os and windows (and linux) are simply wrong. mac os x finally displays the size correctly. a 400GB hard drive IS actually 400GB (base 10). but mac os and windows have always shown GiB (base-2), but labeled it GB. snow leopard finally adresses this (strange) issue.
    Obviously, you have not read my blog post fully. OS X is not fixed. It's just Finder. Everything else is base-2.

Posting Permissions
  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts