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Thread: Apple Inching Closer to FTC Settlement Compliance Deadline

  1. #1
    MMi Staff Writer Michael Essany's Avatar
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    Default Apple Inching Closer to FTC Settlement Compliance Deadline


    The clock is quickly counting down to the deadline in place for Apple to become compliant with the provisions outlined in its recent settlement with the FTC.

    Apple has until March 31st to change how it sells In-App Purchases. This task is incumbent upon Apple as a means to settle a Federal Trade Commission complaint regarding Apple's history of billing consumers large sums of money as a result of underage users (kids) using iDevices without their parents' permission.

    Although such an update would seem relatively simple, we're told it's not. "A source tells me that Apple is scrambling to make changes to the App Store to satisfy a settlement (PDF) with the U.S. Federal Trade Commission," writes Jason D. O'Grady of ZDNet.

    The settlement in question requires Apple to:


    • Modify billing practices to ensure that Apple obtains consumers’ express, informed consent prior to billing them for in-app charges
    • Give consumers must the option to withdraw their consent at any time


    "This probably means the end of the 15-minute no-password window as we know it," O'Grady deduces, adding that Apple's biggest challenge involves restricting how "unscrupulous iOS game developers" can take advantage of the 15-minute no-password loophole by "inundating kids with offers to buy more features."

    Source: ZDNET

  2. #2
    Livin the iPhone Life slim.jim's Avatar
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    You already have to tap at least twice and there is an option to turn off in app purchases all together. Why is that not enough?

  3. #3
    Seriously that guy whose kid spent thousands of $$ on Smurf Berries had no right to complain.

    1. Why did the kid have the iTunes account password???
    2. Why not just disable in-app purchases in Parental Controls/Restrictions???

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by zrevai View Post
    Seriously that guy whose kid spent thousands of $$ on Smurf Berries had no right to complain.

    1. Why did the kid have the iTunes account password???
    2. Why not just disable in-app purchases in Parental Controls/Restrictions???
    He probably did not have the password, but was able to purchase because of the 15-minute window from when the Smurf or some other app was purchased. That is the whole point; games designed to lure children into doing exactly this. I agree that parents should maintain better control of what's happening, but I don't think that excuses the obvious intentions of the developers in cases like this.

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