+ Reply
Page 6 of 6 FirstFirst ... 456
Results 101 to 106 of 106

Your favorite Apple, iPhone, iPad, iOS, Jailbreak, and Cydia site.


Thread: Geohot's Legal Team Takes Aim at Sony

is a discussion within the

Mac News

forums, a part of the

General Apple/Mac

section;
If you were to read every license agreement it would scare you into not using anything. The owner's manual of your car has a long list of actions that it
...
  1. #101
    iPhone? More like MyPhone
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    121
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 18 Times in 10 Posts

    If you were to read every license agreement it would scare you into not using anything. The owner's manual of your car has a long list of actions that it says will void your warranty despite very few of these being enforceable - especially in court.

    I think Geohot's law team's strategy should be to put Sony on the defensive and starting asking the court for access to Sony emails pertaining to the case through the Open Records Law. In doing so, they could uncover enough dirt and bad press (although this case doesn't enough press) that Sony might prefer it just all go away.

  2. #102
    "E" eenofonn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Somewhere Cold
    Posts
    2,761
    Thanks
    3,635
    Thanked 2,690 Times in 1,397 Posts

    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Essany View Post


    Embattled hacker George "Geohot" Hotz isn't going down without a fight in his epic jailbreaking legal battle with Sony. Dragged into a courtroom showdown over his PS3 jailbreaking exploits, Geohot has been subjected to some serious full court pressure by Sony Computer Entertainment America, which is actively seeking to have the case heard in California, conveniently located just outside the company's sprawling headquarters.

    Geohot's lawyer, Stewart Kellar, has finally stepped up to the plate publicly by blasting Sony for demanding that the case be heard in California. Not only would it be "a hardship for Hotz to travel there," it would "set a precedent for companies being able to sue anyone, anywhere, on relatively flimsy grounds," the International Business Times reports.

    Kellar, however, went much further than to just criticize the PS3 maker for trying to relocate Geohot for court. Kellar also says SCEA "isn't even a subsidiary of Sony Japan (the actual producer of the PlayStation 3) and the "entity that should be suing." In addition to arguing why SCEA shouldn't be upset with Geohot, Kellar is seemingly asserting that SCEA doesn't have much to do with this matter, at least in the sense that everything in the PlayStation's "system, software and packaging all point to Sony Japan as the producer."

    The latest efforts by Geohot's legal team represent some degree of good news of the infamous hacker, who last week was accused of "fleeing the country," presumably to evade authorities, critics contended. But Geohot has since rebuffed those mainstream media reports, noting that his vacation was in the works for months and that he was in touch with his lawyers
    for the duration of the trip.

    Source: International Business Times
    Very happy to hear some good news on the subject

  3. #103
    What's Jailbreak?
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    BAY AREA....
    Posts
    12
    Thanks
    6
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Quote Originally Posted by Marty331 View Post
    I just don't get it, if I buy a product I own that product. Can Ford sue me for putting a new engine in my truck? I don't think so. Screw Sony and anyone related to them. Go Geo!
    Of course they can. They just need to slip through a few corrupt loopholes and work out a couple backroom deals and BAM! You're on trial for changing your underwear.

  4. #104
    iPhoneaholic quidam_brujah's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    469
    Thanks
    84
    Thanked 37 Times in 28 Posts

    Quote Originally Posted by Villebilly View Post
    If you were to read every license agreement it would scare you into not using anything. The owner's manual of your car has a long list of actions that it says will void your warranty despite very few of these being enforceable - especially in court.

    I think Geohot's law team's strategy should be to put Sony on the defensive and starting asking the court for access to Sony emails pertaining to the case through the Open Records Law. In doing so, they could uncover enough dirt and bad press (although this case doesn't enough press) that Sony might prefer it just all go away.
    And as frankydabull said... it's all in the license. Just because you don't like or agree with the terms means that you can choose to ignore them. People complaining about how when you buy something, 'you own it', are forgetting that it is all based on the terms of the agreement. If you buy something, say, a car, and there's nothing in the terms that provides any restrictions then you can do whatever you want. This, however, has not typically been the case with computer-based electronics. This has been an issue for years. 10-12 years ago there were CRAZY terms being put into shrinkwrap licenses that you had no idea what you were agreeing to by just OPENING THE PACKAGE -- there used to be wording on the sealed package of disks (remember those?) that said BY OPENING THIS PACKAGE YOU AGREE TO THE TERMS OF THE LICENSE INSIDE!

    By opening the package you agree to the terms of the license that you haven't had the opportunity to even read yet? I don't recall what eventually became of all that, but I think that it was finally challenged in court somewhere and based on a ruling everyone in the industry stopped doing it, but I'm sure they're currently using something almost as ridiculously sneaky.

    Bottom line is, read the agreement to see if you really want to , uh, agree. I never do. Who does? That thing you click on is just something that slows down the install process or gets in the way of your enjoyment of the thing. But, me not taking the time to read it is my problem.

    However, be that as it may, I think Hotz does have an angle if SCEA can't show it is an interested party and has been or anticipates being harmed. The venue issue is probably good as well. Now it's all up to the judge. I'm not a huge fan of Hotz, but, good luck to him.
    Last edited by quidam_brujah; 04-02-2011 at 12:33 PM.

  5. #105
    What's Jailbreak?
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    1
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    I hope geohot takes Sony down a notch.

  6. #106
    What's Jailbreak? telx's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    3
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Anonymous, the notorious hacktivist group originating from the 4chan imageboard, has set its sights on Sony for alleged abuse, victimisation and privacy violations in the legal action against a group of PS3 hackers.

    In an image, posted to the website AnonNews, a member of the group states, "Sony, you have now received the undivided attention of Anonymous. Your recent legal action against our fellow hackers, Geohot and Graf_Chokolo, has not only alarmed us, it has been deemed wholly unforgivable."

    George "Geohot" Hotz and the German-born Alexander "graf_chokolo" Egorenkov are two of the hackers who dismantled the PlayStation 3's security architecture and made the information public. This data has made homebrew software, game piracy and cheating in online games a common occurrence on the console.

    To fight back, Sony has entered a long and bitter legal campaign against the coders and their associates.

    Since January 2011, Hotz has been entangled in a court case with Sony's American division. In February 2011, Sony Europe demanded German police raid Egorenkov's home and seize any equipment related to hacking the PS3. The Japanese gaming titan has also threatened to sue the cheeky coder for a whopping million euros.

    Sony has also had varying degrees of success in demanding information from other sites and services in relation to the case. Paypal gave up all the information on Hotz's account and Sony was able to see the IP addresses of everyone who has visited the hacker's website.

    The manifesto says that the forthcoming attacks will also be for reasons other than the legal actions against Hotz and Egorenkov. "Your corrupt business practices are indicative of a corporate philosophy that would deny consumers the right to use products they have paid for, and rightfully own, in the manner of their choosing," the poster reads.

    "Perhaps you should alert your customers to the fact that they are apparently only renting your products?" it asks. "Anonymous would like to inform you that you have only been 'renting' your web domains."

    Which, presumably, is a call to arms for DDoS attacks and other online villainy against Sony. The group, working under the name " Operation Payback" has used similar techniques to bring down websites for the MPAA and RIAA.

+ Reply
Page 6 of 6 FirstFirst ... 456
Posting Permissions
  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts