Google is now courting major music labels for their proposed new music service, Google Music. Their proposed new music service will include the usual digital downloads, but also expand on the iTunes model to include a subscription cloud-based “digital locker.” Many have wondered if and when iTunes would venture into the cloud, now it seems that Google is set to get there first.

According to industry insiders, the proposed music service would resemble the familiar iTunes business model, but would expand this service to include cloud-based music storage. It is said that users would be able to download songs, and for a $25 yearly fee, be able to store their songs in a “digital locker.” Then users would be able to stream their music to any internet-connected device. Also, users of the service would be able to listen to full-track streams of any song one time before purchasing, then previews would revert back to the usual 30-second sample.

The most intriguing feature of Google Music is its ability to scan a subscriber’s hard drive for music. Every music track licensed to Google would then be accessible to the user though their “digital locker.” The scan of the user’s hard drive would not differentiate where the tracks came from originally, but would allow users to listen to those songs as if they purchased them though Google Music in the first place.

If Google is able to get a majority of the Music exec’s to go along with their new music service, it would be a real contender to iTunes’ dominance. The music industry is notoriously difficult to deal with at times, especially when new technology is involved. We’ll see if Google has the negotiating skills to pull off a deal of this magnitude, the way Steve Jobs has been able to, time and time again. If Google Music does see the light of day in this proposed form, it will be a real treat for music lovers everywhere. How awesome would that be: to finally be able to access music from anywhere, at any time.

Source: Billboard