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  • AppleCare Protection Plan Under Fire in Europe Once Again


    Apple’s infamous AppleCase Protection Plan seems to be in the spotlight once again in Europe after Test-Aankoop/Test-Achats, a Belgian consumer watchdog, filed a complaint against the way Apple markets the product in Europe. Customers within the European Union are entitled to a free two-year warranty with any consumer electronic purchase but Test-Aankoop/Test-Achats is claiming that Apple’s warranty marketing doesn’t properly explain these rights to Belgian shoppers. According to TechCrunch, the Belgian consumer watchdog has teamed up with ten other entities in Europe to file complaints about the way in which Apple operates its AppleCare warranty plan. After receiving little cooperation from the Cupertino California company, the group has decided that it’s time to take the complaint to the courts.

    The group cites a similar lawsuit in Italy, regarding the same exact issue, as a precedent. In the Italian case, Apple was forced to pay a total of €900,000 (approx. $1.2 million) as a penalty and modify its practices for the Italian market. The reason AppleCare plans are such a problem in Europe is because of the rules that are applied in the European Union. Typically, extended warranties are a great way for companies to earn some quick money. While the plans give customers peace of mind and ensure that their gadgets are repaired or replaced for free outside of their standard one-year warranty, many customers tend to not take advantage of them, so they lose out on the money they paid in the first place. In the European Union however, customers get a free two-year warranty for every consumer electronics device they purchase, but not everyone is aware of this and they purchase extended warranties under the assumption they have just one year otherwise.

    Test-Aankoop/Test-Achats is the second European watchdog that claims Apple is continually keeping quiet about the two-year warranty in an effort to sell AppleCare protection plans under false pretense. The group feels that customers should be made aware that the AppleCare protection plan only offers an additional 12 months of cover for customers in the EU because they have the first two years as standard as opposed to one. We’ll have to see what the court decides in this case but as of right now, it doesn’t seem like the battle will be in favor of Apple.

    Source: TechCrunch via Cult of Mac
    This article was originally published in forum thread: AppleCare Protection Plan Under Fire in Europe Once Again started by Akshay Masand View original post
    Comments 10 Comments
    1. spazturtle's Avatar
      spazturtle -
      Took my 2011 macbook pro into a Apple store because the battery was only holding 16% charge after 260 cycles, they confirmed it was faulty but then asked me to pay for it to be replaced, after pointing out the EU law they said that they don't have to comply with the law and that if I wanted it fixed under the law I would have to take them to court.
      So annoyed.
    1. CZroe's Avatar
      CZroe -
      "customers should be made aware that the AppleCare protection plan only offers an additional 12 months of cover for customers in the EU because they have the first two years as standard"

      I thought it only added 12 months here in the States as well (1-year standard manufacturer's warranty, 2-years total with Apple Care extension).
    1. Mrteacup's Avatar
      Mrteacup -
      Quote Originally Posted by spazturtle View Post
      Took my 2011 macbook pro into a Apple store because the battery was only holding 16% charge after 260 cycles, they confirmed it was faulty but then asked me to pay for it to be replaced, after pointing out the EU law they said that they don't have to comply with the law and that if I wanted it fixed under the law I would have to take them to court.
      So annoyed.
      Unbelievable. Just the way they responded is infuriating, maybe if they said they have no jurisdiction over what apple is allowing than that would be 100x better than their attitude.
    1. MPS3's Avatar
      MPS3 -
      wow apple just sad
      the rest of the manufactures give 2 years in EU steep up and play a fair game
    1. dennder's Avatar
      dennder -
      I live in one of the EU's countries. In here apple gives a 2-5% discount (based on the product), if buyer explicitly agrees not to use 2-y EU warranty, or pays full std. price with 2-y warranty.
      Everyone's happy.
    1. spazturtle's Avatar
      spazturtle -
      Quote Originally Posted by dennder View Post
      I live in one of the EU's countries. In here apple gives a 2-5% discount (based on the product), if buyer explicitly agrees not to use 2-y EU warranty, or pays full std. price with 2-y warranty.
      Everyone's happy.
      In the EU you cannot wavier you rights, so even if you agree to this you can still use the 2 year warranty.
    1. GmAz's Avatar
      GmAz -
      Quote Originally Posted by sheon View Post
      thats some ******** i would have not left the store tell they fixed it law is law i would have causes a scene too **** that **** they have to comply by the rules of that country
      There is this little thing called periods. Its a little dot at the end of a sentence as seen with all my sentences. Perhaps you should use them so you don't sound like a bumbling fool. I know, you are probably on some iDevice and the keyboard layouts on those are pretty bad, but still, its an important little dot. I hear capital letters are important too.
    1. dsg's Avatar
      dsg -
      ^^^^Argh, grammar police



      the law is the law, Appl£ are not above it.
    1. dennder's Avatar
      dennder -
      Quote Originally Posted by spazturtle View Post
      In the EU you cannot wavier you rights, so even if you agree to this you can still use the 2 year warranty.
      Unless you were brainwashed by Brussels, that was the stupidest comment i've seen here for a long time. No offence though, mere fact.
      EU is not a legal country entity, therefore, any EU legislation is up to each country to implement according to and in conjunction to existing laws of that country, even if it non-opt act.
      And implementation may differ, as simple as that. There are so many exclusions to 2y warranty here, i can't remember them all...
    1. spazturtle's Avatar
      spazturtle -
      Quote Originally Posted by dennder View Post
      Unless you were brainwashed by Brussels, that was the stupidest comment i've seen here for a long time. No offence though, mere fact.
      EU is not a legal country entity, therefore, any EU legislation is up to each country to implement according to and in conjunction to existing laws of that country, even if it non-opt act.
      And implementation may differ, as simple as that. There are so many exclusions to 2y warranty here, i can't remember them all...
      All 21 have signed a treaty saying that you cannot waiver your rights.