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  • New Retina Display MacBook Pros: Not Customizable


    Did you think you were going to buy the lowest end Retina Display MacBook Pro (to save some money) and then just upgrade the hardware with your own later on? Ha! Think again. According to a recent tear-down by iFixit, Apple is getting insanely close to offering absolutely no aftermarket customizations by the end user. Just take a look at the motherboard image above.

    The box bordered with a green color represents the new 2012 MacBook Proís memory located in the main logic board. The memory is custom, and no regular laptop memory stick is going to be able to be slipped in there like older MacBook Pro models such as 2011 and older. The orange box represents the MacBook Pro's processor, which is the new Ivy Bridge series from Intel. The red box represents the new NVIDA graphics chip that replaced the ATI graphics from the 2011 model of MacBook Pros.

    Also, donít expect to be putting your own hard disk drives or solid state drives in your new Retina Display MacBook Pro. The Retina Display MacBook Pro uses its own flash storage that is a little bit similar to the MacBook Airís version. These are custom-fit for the new MacBook Pro as well.

    In the older models of the MacBook Pro, Apple allowed the user to change out hard disk drives with other hard disk drives or even solid state drives. The user could also exchange their memory for more memory. If daring users were to go further, they could even remove their CD/DVD drive to add a secondary storage drive with a third party accessory.

    With such little accessibility from the end user, Apple is really locking users out of their own hardware with the new 2012 release. However, due to the new slim design of the 2012 MacBook Pro, it is semi-understandable that general hardware would have some trouble fitting. This is especially so with the large battery packs, dual fans, and custom logic board. Unfortunately, it might be a better idea to stick with your older non-Retina Display MacBook Pro if you want your own performance for the right price. Apple charges a pretty penny for their factory upgrades online.

    Sources: iFixit via MacRumors
    This article was originally published in forum thread: New Retina Display MacBook Pros: Not Customizable started by Anthony Bouchard View original post
    Comments 42 Comments
    1. Slim J's Avatar
      Slim J -
      Quote Originally Posted by PatrickGSR94 View Post
      Guess you don't do much graphics-intensive, memory-intensive stuff like 3D graphics rendering, video and audio processing, etc. My work machine has 12 GB RAM and I wish I had more.
      My laptop has 8 GB of RAM. I do a bit of 3D rendering for school and other personal projects. Even using 3ds Max, It's rare that I exceed 5 GB of RAM used. Even playing games, I only use about 6 and that's for the pretty graphic intensive games
    1. PatrickGSR94's Avatar
      PatrickGSR94 -
      Quote Originally Posted by Slim J View Post
      My laptop has 8 GB of RAM. I do a bit of 3D rendering for school and other personal projects. Even using 3ds Max, It's rare that I exceed 5 GB of RAM used. Even playing games, I only use about 6 and that's for the pretty graphic intensive games
      Okay but professional graphics and video use, 3D design, rendering, etc, which is obviously what this is catered for due to the product name, can get much more intensive than that.