• Your favorite

    Apple

    ,

    iPhone

    ,

    iPad

    ,

    iOS

    ,
    Jailbreak
    , and
    Cydia
    site.
  • Judge Rules Against AT&T in Data Throttling Case



    A California judge’s ruling in small claims case could help consumers affected by AT&T’s data throttling policies.

    The Associated Press reported today Judge Russel Nadel ruled in favor of Matt Spaccarelli in Ventura Superior Court in a small claims case against AT&T. Spaccarelli argued that AT&T unfairly slowed data speeds on his iPhone 4’s unlimited data plan. Judge Nadel awarded Spaccarelli $850 in his decision against AT&T.

    Last October AT&T officially started throttling the data of the top 5% of data users and eventually made it clear that only those with unlimited data plans would be affected. AT&T used this move as a way to influence grand-fathered unlimited data users into changing to a tiered plan. AT&T has nearly 17 million customers still operating on unlimited data plans that can be throttled which is just under half of the company’s smartphone users according to the AP.

    AT&T Area Sales Manager Peter Hartlove argued in court that “his employer has the right to modify or cancel customers’ contracts if their data usage adversely affects the network.” AT&T could appeal the decision but, only released the following brief comment:

    “This is a small claims matter. We are evaluating next steps, including appeal. But at the end of the day, our contract governs our relationship with our customers.”

    Hopefully this is a small step in the right direction for consumers in the fight against throttling data use and bringing back unlimited data plans.

    Source: The AP [via 9to5Mac]
    This article was originally published in forum thread: Judge Rules Against AT&T in Data Throttling Case started by Phillip Swanson View original post
    Comments 83 Comments
    1. iamse7en's Avatar
      iamse7en -
      Quote Originally Posted by dadoria2 View Post
      I never said it bypasses AT&T's throttling. I said it unrestricts the flow of data that cellular companies impose on each standard. That's why you can make FaceTime calls on 3G and also why YouTube videos show in hd quality when unrestricted with those apps. It essentially makes your phone believe its on wifi and thus receives data as if your phone was a wifi card as opposed to a mobile phone. Idk if I'm explaining it well. Just try it.
      I don't have throttled speeds, so I can't try it. But what you're basically saying is that you can get "pretty good" speeds on a throttled phone if you activate 3g unrestrictor for say, Netflix app... hence you are "bypassing" the throttling right? In other words, if you didn't activate 3G Unrestrictor for netflix on a throttled phone, it would be very slow. Ironically, I just got a text 5 minutes ago that I've hit the 3GB limit, and that if I go above that in future billing cycles, I will be throttled.
    1. hadzo's Avatar
      hadzo -
      I don't have throttled speeds, so I can't try it. But what you're basically saying is that you can get "pretty good" speeds on a throttled phone if you activate 3g unrestrictor for say, Netflix app... hence you are "bypassing" the throttling right? In other words, if you didn't activate 3G Unrestrictor for netflix on a throttled phone, it would be very slow. Ironically, I just got a text 5 minutes ago that I've hit the 3GB limit, and that if I go above that in future billing cycles, I will be throttled.
      3g unrestrictor only fools the application into thinking that you are on WiFi. It has nothing to do with your carrier. For example: native YouTube app is coded to stream low quality videos from YouTube when you are on 3g network and high quality while on WiFi. 3g unrestrictor fools it into thinking that your device is connected to wifi when its not thus it streams high quality videos.

      PS to my knowledge it has no effect on Netfilx what so ever.
    1. GrecoISU's Avatar
      GrecoISU -
      Any updates if anyone else has attempted this? I hate to bump a five day old thread but I'm curious.