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  • Adobe Says iOS Gamers Can Expect Console Quality Mobile Gaming


    Adobe has made a bold promise to the mobile gaming community. According to Adobe, gamers can expect console quality games on their iDevices thanks to the release of Flash Player 11 and AIR 3. The company says the releases will deliver cross-device development for 3D-intensive games.

    While gamers may be taking a wait-and-see attitude toward the announcement, the developers I spoke with are exponentially more interested in and excited by Adobe's latest efforts. Dozens of new features in Flash Player 11 and AIR 3 allow developers to deliver "a new class of gaming and premium video experiences," Adobe says, as well as sophisticated, data-driven applications with back-end systems integration across devices.

    AIR native extensions add support for unique device features and native code libraries, empowering developers to freely choose the right mix of Flash, HTML5 and native code to provide powerful user experiences across PCs and devices. Flash Player 11 and AIR 3 will be publicly available in early October. Flash Builder and Flex, Adobe’s open source framework for building mobile, Web and desktop apps, will offer support for the new features in an upcoming release before the end of the year.
    “With this milestone release Adobe pushes the envelope of what is possible on the Web with a typical PC and opens up a new world of immersive, high-performance gaming experiences,” said Danny Winokur, vice president and general manager of Platform for Adobe. “Flash offers the best way for content owners to deliver their most demanding experiences, including games, premium video and sophisticated data-driven apps, to all of their users, while HTML 5 tools such as Adobe Edge and Dreamweaver are ideal for building interactive Web pages, rich ads, branded microsites and general-purpose mobile applications.”

    Here's the full list of new features served up by Flash Player 11 and AIR 3:
    • Accelerated 2D/3D Graphics: Full hardware-accelerated rendering for 2D and 3D graphics enable 1,000 times faster rendering performance over Flash Player 10 and AIR 2. Developers are able to animate millions of objects with smooth 60 frames per second rendering and deliver console-quality games on Mac OS, Windows and connected televisions. A pre-release brings these same accelerated 2D and 3D capabilities to mobile platforms including Android, Apple iOS and BlackBerry Tablet OS. A production release for mobile platforms is expected in the near future. For examples of 3D games for Flash Player, visit Gaming | Adobe.
    • AIR Native Extensions: With support for thousands of highly-optimized, open-source libraries, developers are able to tap into unique software and hardware capabilities including access to device data, vibration control, magnetometers, light sensors, dual screens, near field communications (NFC) and more. Native extensions also allow developers to more deeply integrate AIR applications with other business software.
    • Captive Runtime: Developers can automatically package AIR 3 with their applications to simplify the installation process on Android, Windows and Mac OS in addition to Apple iOS. Users no longer have to download and update AIR separately on any of these platforms, or BlackBerry Tablet OS, which includes AIR built in. In addition, with the captive runtime option developers can manage version updates to their application independent of general AIR updates by Adobe.
    • Content Protection: Premium video content can now be protected using Adobe Flash Access® 3 across all supported platforms, including new support for mobile platforms.
    • HD Video Quality Across Platforms: Full frame rate HD video can now be displayed within AIR applications on Apple iOS devices using H.264 hardware decoding. Rich applications on televisions are also able to deliver HD video with 7.1 channel surround sound.
    • Rental and Subscriptions Support: With support for Adobe Flash Access and Adobe Pass, content publishers can take advantage of rental and subscription options for more flexible business models and offer TV Everywhere content to more than 80 percent of U.S. pay TV subscribers.
    • Compatibility: 64-bit support on Linux, Mac OS and Windows ensures a seamless experience with the latest 64-bit browsers.

    Source: Adobe
    This article was originally published in forum thread: Adobe Says iOS Gamers Can Expect Console Quality Mobile Gaming started by Michael Essany View original post
    Comments 16 Comments
    1. Jarolin Vargas's Avatar
      Jarolin Vargas -
      this sounds too good to be true.
    1. bigliquid530's Avatar
      bigliquid530 -
      Does this mean I can play MW3 on my ipad
    1. emerica6708's Avatar
      emerica6708 -
      Does this mean games in the AppStore or games in a web app?
    1. plnkeye21's Avatar
      plnkeye21 -
      We've been hearing about Flash on iDevices for some time now, when is it going to be available, and which platforms? 3GS/4/4(s)/5? iOS?? 4+? 5 only?
    1. Slmchrist's Avatar
      Slmchrist -
      Wow that would be great, iOS is good but it really needs flash IMO. I hope this is true!!
    1. feidhlim1986's Avatar
      feidhlim1986 -
      It doesn't matter how good a game can look on iOS, without physical buttons gaming on iOS will continue to be miles behind consoles and gaming handhelds in terms of the quality of game.
    1. Poseidon79's Avatar
      Poseidon79 -
      Quote Originally Posted by Slmchrist View Post
      Wow that would be great, iOS is good but it really needs flash IMO. I hope this is true!!
      Tell which which Android smart phones you have owned... How you have utilized Flash on a constant basis.. And your avg battery life.

      Recent reviews of the newest biggest and baddest Android phone.. The Droid Bionic.. Have amazing specs! Specs don't mean crap when you only get 6-8 hours under moderate use though. I'll stick with HTML 5 any day of the week. Flash is so CPU intensive during hardware rendering it's insane.. It was never ever meant for a mobile application.
    1. Aenima133's Avatar
      Aenima133 -
      Quote Originally Posted by feidhlim1986 View Post
      It doesn't matter how good a game can look on iOS, without physical buttons gaming on iOS will continue to be miles behind consoles and gaming handhelds in terms of the quality of game.
      They have Bluetooth controllers and stuff for that. So maybe there is a real future in this if apple would embrace gaming accessories a bit more.
    1. Lombardo Joe's Avatar
      Lombardo Joe -
      Quote Originally Posted by Poseidon79 View Post
      Specs don't mean crap when you only get 6-8 hours under moderate use though. I'll stick with HTML 5 any day of the week. Flash is so CPU intensive during hardware rendering it's insane.. It was never ever meant for a mobile application.
      +1
    1. phoenix904's Avatar
      phoenix904 -
      >mfw more adobe+apple promises.
    1. teej1410's Avatar
      teej1410 -
      Quote Originally Posted by feidhlim1986 View Post
      It doesn't matter how good a game can look on iOS, without physical buttons gaming on iOS will continue to be miles behind consoles and gaming handhelds in terms of the quality of game.
      I agree totally. Touch screen "buttons" aren't buttons. It's even more awkward playing games that has a "joystick". It may be buttons and joysticks on screen but your still touching plain glass. I like to feel the buttons and joysticks.
    1. c0deName_ZERO's Avatar
      c0deName_ZERO -
      ^^^^^^^ i agree ^^^^^^^^ but "Flash Player 11 and AIR 3 will be publicly available in early October" iOS5 will be also announced and released around the same time ......lol just another conspiracy theory .......
    1. k.nitsua's Avatar
      k.nitsua -
      I thought this was referring to Adobe Flash's ability to compile iOS apps. Not necessarily having the iDevices run Flash via the web but as a native app that really ISN'T Flash in the strict sense but a recompiled version of the original Flash app. It's just Adobe's workaround for not only iOS boycott of Flash but also Windows as well since Metro's Internet Explorer WILL NOT support plug-ins (only the IE in the Desktop environment will support it). Adobe is also working on server-side conversion and streaming of Flash content in order to properly display it on HTML5 optimized websites. With all these workarounds and such, it's a wonder why Adobe just doesn't revamp Flash as an HTML5 branch.
    1. sziklassy's Avatar
      sziklassy -
      Quote Originally Posted by Poseidon79 View Post
      Tell which which Android smart phones you have owned... How you have utilized Flash on a constant basis.. And your avg battery life.

      Recent reviews of the newest biggest and baddest Android phone.. The Droid Bionic.. Have amazing specs! Specs don't mean crap when you only get 6-8 hours under moderate use though. I'll stick with HTML 5 any day of the week. Flash is so CPU intensive during hardware rendering it's insane.. It was never ever meant for a mobile application.
      This statement is very flawed. Are you implying that the Bionic's battery life has to do with Flash? Does this mean that all Android's suffer in battery life only because flash is available to them? Regardless, this simply isn't the case. The HTC EVO does just fine (from personal experience) running flash websites. Granted, I am not talking browsing websites all day with flash content, but it is GREAT to be able to quickly browse the full website without being told "sorry, you need flash for this". I have said before, it is nice to have the OPTION to use flash. On android, it can be disabled for those who are truly worried about battery life. Seems to me like this should/could be a fine option on iOS as well. If we are talking about flash as a huge battery drain, the specs of the phone should be largely irrelevant. Apple needs to stop telling their users what they want and just listen to their users.

      I still do not understand how mobile OS laws don't intertwine with computer OS laws. If Apple tried to restrict the installation of third party software on OSX they would be slammed in court. Ridiculous that this isn't the case for iOS (and any other mobile platform involving these practices).
    1. Ryry506's Avatar
      Ryry506 -
      So is apple finally putting flash back on idevices? They had it on iOS 3.x but said it drained the battery life which was bs cus their are devices that have flash and have good battery life if apple had flash then forget about competition.
    1. raduga's Avatar
      raduga -
      Quote Originally Posted by sziklassy View Post
      I still do not understand how mobile OS laws don't intertwine with computer OS laws. If Apple tried to restrict the installation of third party software on OSX they would be slammed in court. Ridiculous that this isn't the case for iOS (and any other mobile platform involving these practices).
      Part of the reason Apple would likely get "slammed" has to do with user expectations, and part of it has to do with EULA and license terms and agreements.

      People who buy Macintoshes generally expect that they'll be able to install arbitrary 3rd party software, because that's the way its always been (for products roughly like Macintoshes). They also don't sign (or virtually sign) highly restrictive agreements that limit their ability do arbitrary tricks and fun stuff.

      iOS on the other hand, was a Walled Garden from the get-go. Everyone with an iPhone/iPT/iPad has to click through that long bit of text that hardly everyone reads. Most users stay within the Walled Garden, either not aware of the JB community or understandably nervous about "hackerz".

      Sure, there's room for lawsuits, but most users in iOS don't have the same expectations as they do with Macs. If you can't prove that Apple deceived you it's going to be difficult to collect money or damages. There's no law that mandates "computers must be open and non-proprietary", though if you'd like to see one, go talk to RMS. What Apple does now is annoying to end-users, annoying to developers, reassuring to "content creators" (aka bulk copyright holders and IP owners), and profitable for Apple.

      It's also created a nice little niche market for pro and semi-pro developers who find themselves siding with "content creators" - though they won't ever reap anywhere near the benefits of the big corporate structures that curiously do more to impede and thwart "the Progress of Science and useful Arts," than promote it. Yep, the AppStore can be both annoying, and profitable to devs at the same time. A bit of frisson, I think.