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  • Cydia Creator Goes to Court to Obtain Cydia Domain Name


    Although many of the major domain name disputes we've heard about in recent months involve Apple reportedly having to cough up millions for domains they feel entitled to, there is no shortage of domain-related drama in our community too.

    Jay Freeman - also known as Saurik among jailbreakers - is recognized the world over as the man, the myth, the legend behind Cydia. Now, the creator of this jailbreaking juggernaut is pursuing in court that which should legally be his - Cydia.com, the digital territory that Freeman asserts should be his domain.

    According to the legal documents pertinent to Saurik's lawsuit (made available via DomainNameWire), Saurik contends that the current owner of Cydia.com is infringing upon the Cydia brand and trademark. Consequently, Saurik is asking for ownership of Cydia.com.

    From DomainNameWire: "The company’s in rem lawsuit against the Cydia.com domain name alleges that the owner of the domain name changed the content of the page from a parked page to one about Apple products after it contacted him."

    In addition to Suarik's bid for the Cydia.com domain, his company - Saurikit LLC - is seeking damages for legal fees.

    Source: DomainNameWire
    This article was originally published in forum thread: Cydia Creator Goes to Court to Obtain Cydia Domain Name started by Michael Essany View original post
    Comments 44 Comments
    1. Hosko817's Avatar
      Hosko817 -
      Quote Originally Posted by bigliquid530 View Post
      I Thought if they bought the domain name they own it, isn't it that simple, so in turn if someone wants it they should have to pay for it regardless of the price they put on it(Not trying to be a smart azz just wondering isn't that how it goes).....
      Well you do own it for a period. Has to be renewed every so often or you lose the rights to the domain name. A really good example of what these people do is "playstation". See this link: playstation5.com This domain is for sale. Guess what? some years down the road these people are banking on the fact that sony will keep the playstation brand around till a 5th gen console comes out and when that time comes sony will pay up. OR they can unload it to some other d-bag first. It happens to every well known brand and any name that may payoff down the road.
    1. oss001's Avatar
      oss001 -
      Quote Originally Posted by KraXik View Post
      Have you just ignored all the above posts? Try and post something that's slightly relevant and makes sense.

      Troll much?
      Didn't realize my message was so cryptic, sorry about that... Point being is that Saurik has built his brand, and now another company is capitalizing on this with misinformation. Apple is a pretty generic term, but Apple Computers has the rights. If apple dot org started making money on their site using Apple product misinformation do you not think there would be an issue?

      Saurik, why do you feel entitled to the name if they've indeed owned it since before you ever heard of an iPhone? I don't think the jaylenoshow.com story applies here, since jay leno is a person's name while cydia is a word that's older than dirt. I grant you that people might be going to cydia.com by mistake, hoping to learn about your software, but isn't that ultimately because you decided to use the name cydia even though it was already trademarked and in use?
      This was my reasoning behind the Apple analogy. So, yes I did read the article...
    1. clockworkengine's Avatar
      clockworkengine -
      You guys keep calling the internet real-estate guys d-bags and then lauding Saurik for doing what he has to for his business. Idealize it if you want, but they're both businesses, and both are legitimate. Internet domain name ownership and sales is as old as the public internet itself. It's not illegal, and just because you think they're scum of the earth doesn't mean their rights are any less relevant. If Sony were smart, they would have planned ahead and spent a few bucks on the domain names of any possible subsequent playstation successors within the conceivable range of the system's lifespan. Same goes for Saurik. Or he could have used a different name. I respect his opinion but there's a phrase called "a day late and a dollar short" that applies here. Do your business. Don't try to stop someone else from doing theirs just because the interest of their business has collided against your business interests. And if you DO try to interfere with someone else's business, don't try to act like the hero because you're not.
    1. Hosko817's Avatar
      Hosko817 -
      I understand your point of view and never said their rights were less relevant. Nobody's "lauding" Saurik either for that matter. However youd be pretty pissed if you decided to start up a business and wanted to offer your goods and services online only to find out that I registered "clockworkengine".com already, and decided that what you thought was a fair to more than fair price for the domain wasn't enough. hmmmm... while I'm at it let me think of some possible typo's somebody might make while typing "clockworkengine".com. I think i'll just register clkworkengine, clockwrkengine, etc.. Now, if I finally do decide to sell you the original, I have these others just incase a competitor wants to divert traffic to their site. Here is a nice example of that right here: rotorooterplumming.com Hey!,wait I thought I was goint to a rotorooter site not 303-plumber!

      If Sony were smart, they would have planned ahead and spent a few bucks on the domain names of any possible subsequent playstation successors within the conceivable range of the system's lifespan. Same goes for Saurik.
      registering Gtld's may be innexpensive if your only doing a couple, But add on CCtld's, future versions, products, typo's ,Numbers, words before and after your brand name, It adds up to a lot of domains and a lot of money that you "should have planned ahead for.