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  • New Super Wi-Fi Standard Closer to Reality



    The IEEE 802.22 standard has finally been published by the IEEE which means it is official. And with its officialness, 22 Mbps per channel downloads up to 100km from the transmitter are that much closer to becoming an everyday reality.

    The hope for the new standard is that it will provide broadband access to rural regions and regions that have been long ignored by telecom infrastructure across the world. The new standard for Wireless Regional Area Networks (WRANS) utilizes the same space of bandwidth previously used for analog television broadcasts.

    The new "Super" Wi-Fi as some are branding it, is currently only available in the Houston area thanks to Rice University Researchers. Hopefully the roll out of this new wireless broadband tech speeds up a bit, the FCC approved it nearly a year ago and Houston is the only thing we have to show for it.

    Hopefully iPhones and iPads in rural areas wont have to wait much longer for sweet broadband relief.

    Source: Business Wire
    This article was originally published in forum thread: New Super Wi-Fi Standard Closer to Reality started by Phillip Swanson View original post
    Comments 20 Comments
    1. ScottyOhio's Avatar
      ScottyOhio -
      nice
    1. eightyk88's Avatar
      eightyk88 -
      Neat
    1. dabisnit's Avatar
      dabisnit -
      Finally! Wifi in my house possibly faster than 150 kpbs!
    1. gthugballin's Avatar
      gthugballin -
      note worthy
    1. Tucnepo's Avatar
      Tucnepo -
      Great could this mean cheaper internet bills?
    1. RICO_'s Avatar
      RICO_ -
      So what does this mean exactly? If I have a router at home i can connect to it with my iPhone from across town and use data that way?

      If that's the case then what would be the need for a data plan through a wireless provider if WiFi signals can reach clear across an entire city?
    1. eightyk88's Avatar
      eightyk88 -
      Quote Originally Posted by RICO_ View Post
      So what does this mean exactly? If I have a router at home i can connect to it with my iPhone from across town and use data that way?

      If that's the case then what would be the need for a data plan through a wireless provider if WiFi signals can reach clear across an entire city?
      I believe it would be a way to use the already existing old analog tv signal a new use probably subscription based and hardware required to broadcast the wifi signal, much like plugging the coaxial into a modem then router.
    1. RICO_'s Avatar
      RICO_ -
      Quote Originally Posted by eightyk88 View Post
      I believe it would be a way to use the already existing old analog tv signal a new use probably subscription based and hardware required to broadcast the wifi signal, much like plugging the coaxial into a modem then router.
      Well in that case I don't see how it would lower Internet service prices. If anything I would assume that it would be offered as an add-on package with its ability to reach farther than traditional WiFi.
    1. donozo's Avatar
      donozo -
      Sweet this is going to be a killer for mobile data plans
    1. BenderRodriguez's Avatar
      BenderRodriguez -
      Quote Originally Posted by RICO_ View Post
      So what does this mean exactly? If I have a router at home i can connect to it with my iPhone from across town and use data that way?

      If that's the case then what would be the need for a data plan through a wireless provider if WiFi signals can reach clear across an entire city?
      It's saying the standard for rural areas is 20mbps areas that have never had internet or lie outside main cities I believe unless I totally forget what rural means at 2:38am
    1. Mysterion's Avatar
      Mysterion -
      Wi-Fi a great thing
    1. Tripz71's Avatar
      Tripz71 -
      Very nice, Lets hope it takes less time to implement this than it has taken the 4g network.
      oppps..... still waiting on 4g in my area .
    1. spazturtle's Avatar
      spazturtle -
      Quote Originally Posted by Tripz71 View Post
      Very nice, Lets hope it takes less time to implement this than it has taken the 4g network.
      oppps..... still waiting on 4g in my area .
      4G is still being developed. I think you mean LTE, the only place that has 4G is the Isle of Man because that is where all the mobile standards are tested.

      LTE is 3.7G it is a lot slow than 4G and the signal is not as strong.
    1. Dazz187s's Avatar
      Dazz187s -
      Quote Originally Posted by ScottyOhio View Post
      nice
      ..niiiccceeeee.
    1. lesliespawpaw's Avatar
      lesliespawpaw -
      This is only going to make everyone buy new hardware. I am using a miff lte 4g right now. In good signal 10meg average with 25meg peak
    1. Hondamaker's Avatar
      Hondamaker -
      Quote Originally Posted by spazturtle View Post
      4G is still being developed. I think you mean LTE, the only place that has 4G is the Isle of Man because that is where all the mobile standards are tested.

      LTE is 3.7G it is a lot slow than 4G and the signal is not as strong.
      Since 4G is really 4th Generation, you're saying there's a 3.7th generation? LOL
    1. obutto's Avatar
      obutto -
      LTE, WiMax, etc...A standard would be nice. Tired of all these fragmented phones.
    1. Imahottguy's Avatar
      Imahottguy -
      Quote Originally Posted by Hondamaker View Post
      Since 4G is really 4th Generation, you're saying there's a 3.7th generation? LOL
      When it comes to wireless service, there is a 3.7G. The people that set the bar for the "G's" have already defined what the speeds have to be, to be considered 4G. Sadly, the carriers here in the states have simply ignored them and touted their own technologies as 4G. So now there is confusion as to what exactly is what. From what I understand, there is no 4G in America, yet.
    1. spazturtle's Avatar
      spazturtle -
      Quote Originally Posted by Hondamaker View Post
      Since 4G is really 4th Generation, you're saying there's a 3.7th generation? LOL
      Read: 3GPP Long Term Evolution - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

      Then read: 4G - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

      Taken from the 4G page "The pre-4G technology 3GPP Long Term Evolution (LTE) is often branded "4G", but the first LTE release does not fully comply with the IMT-Advanced requirements."

      LTE Speed:
      Peak Download 100 Mbit/s
      Peak Upload 50 Mbit/s

      4G Speed:
      Peak Download 1 Gbit/s
      Peak Upload 500 Mbit/s

      Both were taken form the 4G page (The second one I linked)


      EDIT: The standards are set by the 'International Telecommunication Union Radiocommunication Sector'
    1. krosis's Avatar
      krosis -
      Regarding the 802.22 standard, it's really more geared towards rural broadband than mobile phones. The incredibly broad spectrum involved here requires a lot of complexity (or modularity) on the radio engineering side. I think having a single pocket sized device that will just work on any 802.22 setup is quite a ways off. I'd expect the first CPE devices to be wifi routers with a modular transmitter / antenna component that can be selected based on your area / needs.

      Running a base station will most likely exceed the cost / needs of actual consumers with this generation. I wouldn't be surprised if operating one requires a FCC license, and VHF transmitters are not exactly inconspicuous if you want to cover good distance (Think HOA rules and lightning safety).

      Quote Originally Posted by spazturtle View Post
      Read: 3GPP Long Term Evolution - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

      Then read: 4G - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

      Taken from the 4G page "The pre-4G technology 3GPP Long Term Evolution (LTE) is often branded "4G", but the first LTE release does not fully comply with the IMT-Advanced requirements."

      LTE Speed:
      Peak Download 100 Mbit/s
      Peak Upload 50 Mbit/s

      4G Speed:
      Peak Download 1 Gbit/s
      Peak Upload 500 Mbit/s

      Both were taken form the 4G page (The second one I linked)


      EDIT: The standards are set by the 'International Telecommunication Union Radiocommunication Sector'
      Well if you really want to get picky about terminology, don't trust Wikipedia, go right to the source:
      Quote Originally Posted by ITU Press Release View Post
      Following a detailed evaluation against stringent technical and operational criteria, ITU has determined that “LTE-Advanced” and “WirelessMAN-Advanced” should be accorded the official designation of IMT-Advanced. As the most advanced technologies currently defined for global wireless mobile broadband communications, IMT-Advanced is considered as “4G”, although it is recognized that this term, while undefined, may also be applied to the forerunners of these technologies, LTE and WiMax, and to other evolved 3G technologies providing a substantial level of improvement in performance and capabilities with respect to the initial third generation systems now deployed. The detailed specifications of the IMT-Advanced technologies will be provided in a new ITU-R Recommendation expected in early 2012.
      So basically the ITU is giving up on the "4G" term allowing it to be "undefined" and used to refer to LTE and others, while relying on just the IMT-Advanced label for the speeds you mention.

      I think the lesson is don't get too caught up in the "G" labels. Remember that according to the ITU, GSM EDGE is considered 3G speed even though nobody advertises it as such.