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  • iPod nano has a Secret Diagnostic Mode


    It would seem the latest iPod nano models have a secret diagnostic screen dubbed “iTerm.” This screen allows users to test various features of the iPod nano, such as: the power, audio, remote, TV Out, LCD, IO, FM receiver, memory, the touch panel and accelerometer. You navigate this screen using the Sleep/Wake and Volume buttons.

    There is also a Disk Mode that when activated allows the nano to appear as an external USB disk when connected to a computer. You’ll know you are in Disk Mode when the nano’s screen turns from its usual color to a retro-looking black and white screen reminiscent of earlier-model iPods.

    It is quite easy to activate either the diagnostic or the disc mode: First, reset the iPod nano by holding down the Sleep/Wake button and Volume Down button until the Apple logo appears. Then:
    • To enter Diagnostic Mode: Reset iPod and continue to hold down all three buttons. “iTerm: iPod Display Console” will flash briefly on screen.
    • To enter Disk Mode: Reset iPod and hold down both Volume buttons.



    The sixth generation iPod nano carries a new codename that appears at the top of the “iTerm” screen, N20 Snowfox. The last generation iPod nano had a similar codename: N33 GreatDane. Also held over from the last iPod nano model is a hibernation mode that puts the device into a low-power mode after 14 hours of inactivity.

    These diagnostic screens are nothing new for iPods, but it does give users a closer look at the way Apple designs and tests its iconic products. This new information is not terribly useful for the average iPod nano user, but it is rather cool to see a little bit of what’s under the hood.

    Source: iLounge
    This article was originally published in forum thread: iPod nano has a Secret Diagnostic Mode started by Wiley John Wright View original post
    Comments 48 Comments
    1. sdjmchattie's Avatar
      sdjmchattie -
      Quote Originally Posted by CZroe View Post
      No he didn't. "Got it in one" does not mean "The current-gen iPod nano does not have video playback."

      Let's look at that again...
      "Got it in one"
      WHAT has got WHAT in one WHAT? Without answering any of those NECESSARY questions, it is completely *meaningless*

      You must not be speaking English because, using the only assumptions one could possibly make, this is the most sense it can possibly make and it STILL doesn't answer the damn question:
      "[The iPod nano has] got [video playback] in one"

      Even then, WHICH iPod nano has video playback in WHAT? We already know now, thanks to someone more eloquent and helpful than sdjmchattie could ever be (thanks, Silencer_0), that it DOES NOT have video playback, yet there is not a negative to be found in the "Got it in one" statement.

      If you intend to insult me, you really need to explain how you got the illogical answer, "the current-gen iPod nano no longer supports video playback" from some guy saying "Got it in one."

      OK, not sure why this has so much hate towards me - and I'm sorry you didn't understand my reply, but I assure you my English is better than yours given that I am from England where the language originated.

      Anyway, it turns out, though I didn't know this before, that the expression "Got it in one" is a British expression and not as global as I first thought. It means, "you had one guess and got it right first time".
    1. one1's Avatar
      one1 -
      Quote Originally Posted by sdjmchattie View Post
      OK, not sure why this has so much hate towards me - and I'm sorry you didn't understand my reply, but I assure you my English is better than yours given that I am from England where the language originated.

      Anyway, it turns out, though I didn't know this before, that the expression "Got it in one" is a British expression and not as global as I first thought. It means, "you had one guess and got it right first time".
      No, it's just as common in the US and pretty easy to understand IMO.
    1. CZroe's Avatar
      CZroe -
      Quote Originally Posted by sdjmchattie View Post
      OK, not sure why this has so much hate towards me - and I'm sorry you didn't understand my reply, but I assure you my English is better than yours given that I am from England where the language originated.

      Anyway, it turns out, though I didn't know this before, that the expression "Got it in one" is a British expression and not as global as I first thought. It means, "you had one guess and got it right first time".
      Thank you for the explanation. If One1 had done that instead of attempting to shame my understanding of the English language, I would not have taken that tone with either of you. My attitude toward you was partially due to another post of yours that didn't make sense (GellBrake'rrrr even called you out on it), but I'm sure that was an honest mistake. When you said "Don't are what use it would be on an iPod that can only play music, but maybe it's just for the audio." I now think you meant "[I d]on't [know] what use it would be on an iPod that can only play music, but maybe it's just for the audio." I could not have guessed earlier, considering that I didn't understand your other post, and "are" is a far cry from "know." I'm not considering the common you/your typo earlier in that post of yours. Even then, as far as I knew, you weren't sure about the capabilities either, which could imply that you take the presence of a video output feature to mean that it probably CAN play video because you would not see the use of it otherwise.

      Quote Originally Posted by one1 View Post
      No, it's just as common in the US and pretty easy to understand IMO.
      No, I believe you're mistaken. In fact, I know you are because it was asked again by others in this thread as well (like mikerlx). The answer did not make sense to us. Yes, I've heard similar statements used in a different context, like when someone is making a series of guesses (obviously, the origin of the phrase), but this other usage is not common at all. "You guessed it [right/correctly]." is much more common and more easily understood even with the word "correctly" being left off and assumed. To insist that this usage of "Got it in one." is particularly well understood here is like the hard-headed people who go around saying "Ten of Twelve" to mean "Ten minutes before Twelve o'clock." It doesn't make any sense in English and they go about using it as if everyone understood them despite most of the country and the English-speaking world having never heard it said that way in their lives. The usage needs to die. I touched off a huge debate in a public forum once where many people from the NE USA thought that everyone understood them (it's even in their textbooks for children's time-telling lessons), insisting that it was the most commonly understood way even after many of their close neighbors(regionally) said that they, too, had never heard it nor would they have understood it if they had heard it. In their attempt to argue that it could be understood without prior knowledge, those same people LOVE to point out that "o'clock" means "of the clock" without realizing that the relationship is BACKWARDS. If I am half OF the way to a destination, I mean that I have traveled half of the way, not that half of the total distance remains. This is obvious once you say something like "one-third of the way." Three hours of the clock, AKA "Three o'clock," means that three hours have passed since the start of the clock, yet "10 of Three" means that ten minutes remain until the Three o'clock hour. I bolded the word they should have used instead. To relate minutes before the hour, "till," " 'til," "until," "to," and "before" CAN be universally understood in the English language without having been heard in that specific arrangement before. That's why you have movies with names like "10 'til Noon" and not "10 of Noon." Mainstream media professionals would NEVER use "[minutes] of [hour]" in anything intended for a national or international audience, so these closed-minded people shouldn't expect to use it in professional conversation and argue to protect their habits.
    1. robertr1's Avatar
      robertr1 -
      Quote Originally Posted by sdjmchattie View Post
      but I assure you my English is better than yours given that I am from England where the language originated.
      That makes no sense. Just because the English language originated in England doesn't automatically mean you're english is better.
    1. sdjmchattie's Avatar
      sdjmchattie -
      Quote Originally Posted by robertr1 View Post
      That makes no sense. Just because the English language originated in England doesn't automatically mean you're english is better.
      Maybe not, but the fact you used "you're" instead of "your" reassures me that it is!
    1. Cer0's Avatar
      Cer0 -
      Get back on topic.
    1. coolguy742's Avatar
      coolguy742 -
      Quote Originally Posted by sdjmchattie View Post
      Maybe not, but the fact you used "you're" instead of "your" reassures me that it is!
      This is a thread about the iPod nano not languages retards.
    1. Sarah Hastings's Avatar
      Sarah Hastings -
      I wonder,what more can we get from this diagnostic mode?