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  • Apple in Hot Water Over Moisture Indicators?



    Forget a potential lawsuit from Adobe, Apple is already in the legal cross-hairs of a woman from San Fransisco who is taking the tech giant to court over claims that Apple is wrongfully denying warranty coverage for its products that have had their moisture sensors activated.

    If you've ever dropped your iPhone in the bathtub or your iPod in the toilet (which, believe me, happens more frequently than you would imagine), your device's moisture sensors were triggered. As a result, Apple can refuse to service or replace the gadget since you were the one who obviously dampened your device.

    Well, it turns out that California resident Charlene Gallion has had enough with Apple's policies pertaining to moisture sensors and she's airing her grievances in court. In a nutshell, the suit filed "on behalf of herself and others similarly situated" alleges that the moisture sensors employed by Apple to detect accidents, liquid submersion, and other gaffes that would render null and void the Apple warranty are not accurate and, therefore, should not be the sole criteria used for denying warranty coverage.

    Gallion asserts that "external Liquid Submersion Indicators produce false-positive results," arguing that independent testing demonstrates that "Liquid Submersion Indicators can be triggered by, among other things, cold weather and humidity that are within Apple's technical specifications for the Class Devices." Apple, however, says that "These indicators will be activated when they come in direct contact with water or a liquid containing water. They are designed not to be triggered by humidity and temperature changes that are within the product's environmental requirements described by Apple."

    While it isn't exactly clear what the outcome of Gallion's efforts will be, she is certainly standing up for many folks who have been denied warranty service because their device was "dropped in water" even though it wasn't. Indeed, Apple's moisture sensors do, in fact, get it wrong sometimes. But how these occasional glitches can be dealt with in a legal setting isn't exactly clear yet.

    Image via tmcnet
    This article was originally published in forum thread: Apple in Hot Water Over Moisture Indicators? started by Michael Essany View original post
    Comments 56 Comments
    1. HungryHungryNico's Avatar
      HungryHungryNico -
      Awesome.
    1. PAKIS-RULEZ's Avatar
      PAKIS-RULEZ -
      she will lose the case unless she does her own trials and find that humid weather does effect the sensors! she don't know who she messing with lol
      "gaylord of all The apple"
    1. buttrr76's Avatar
      buttrr76 -
      I was denied warranty of my 3gs because the bottom water sensor said my phone has been wet. I had gotten a sunflower seed stuck in there and i noticed the sensor changed to red after i got it out. Im now stuck hoping no more problems happen to my phone until the new 4th gen come out.
    1. tw1zt3d's Avatar
      tw1zt3d -
      i had one of the geniuses at the apple store tell me if i had my phone on my night nightstand which is under my a/c unit, that the moisture around the unit could activate the sensors.
    1. ScubaSteve00S's Avatar
      ScubaSteve00S -
      Same Problem. I had to buy my wife a new phone because it was overheating and when we took it in they said it had been exposed to moisture...so stupid!
    1. whereswaldo's Avatar
      whereswaldo -
      stick it to the man!
    1. buskeyl's Avatar
      buskeyl -
      How can we lend our voice to her fight? I reported them the better business buearu as a resuot of the single open to the air indicator at the dock port getting triggered. They should not be allowed to deny warranty claims unless all three of them trigger. Thats just Apple using their big lawyers and big bank accounts to screw the consumer out of four or five hundered bucks to control costs of crappy engineering regarding where they put the indicators.
    1. Nerologic's Avatar
      Nerologic -
      Quote Originally Posted by buttrr76 View Post
      I was denied warranty of my 3gs because the bottom water sensor said my phone has been wet. I had gotten a sunflower seed stuck in there and i noticed the sensor changed to red after i got it out. Im now stuck hoping no more problems happen to my phone until the new 4th gen come out.
      Just take it apart and remove the sensor and put a piece of paper in its place.

      Then go to a different apple store and exchange?

      Worked for me lol
    1. cheesehotdog's Avatar
      cheesehotdog -
      Quote Originally Posted by Nerologic View Post
      Just take it apart and remove the sensor and put a piece of paper in its place.

      Then go to a different apple store and exchange?

      Worked for me lol
      Are you serious ? LOL!
    1. black_orchid's Avatar
      black_orchid -
      That looks like one of the 4 iphones that I've dropped in the toilet
      lol
    1. roomer11's Avatar
      roomer11 -
      Environmental requirements
      Operating temperature: 32 to 95 F (0 to 35 C)
      Nonoperating temperature: -4 to 113 F (-20 to 45 C)
      Relative humidity: 5% to 95% noncondensing
      Maximum operating altitude: 10,000 feet (3000 m)

      Apple's stance
    1. cashboxz01's Avatar
      cashboxz01 -
      For those who live in Michigan like me, this is a big problem here, because of the bipolar weather. All of my phones/my friend's phone's moisture indicators are activated. Nobody can ever exchange a phone even if they have warranty because of that.
    1. rhekt's Avatar
      rhekt -
      so how about when you go to bestbuy and you get that special screen protector that you never have to replace? the instructions require you to dampen the iphone surface [with water] for application of the film.
    1. UiK's Avatar
      UiK -
      How can u tell if your moisture indicator is activated? I never even knew the iPhone had a moisture indicator!
    1. steve-z17's Avatar
      steve-z17 -
      Cool that she's representing a lot of people with the same problem, but I think there's a slim chance of her getting anywhere. Who knows though..stranger things have happened.
    1. lolcats1's Avatar
      lolcats1 -
      Quote Originally Posted by cheesehotdog View Post
      Are you serious ? LOL!
      my keyboard stopped working cause of water, but the "sensors" were still good, so they had to replace for free.
    1. ddfilms's Avatar
      ddfilms -
      Quote Originally Posted by UiK View Post
      How can u tell if your moisture indicator is activated? I never even knew the iPhone had a moisture indicator!
      There are 2 water sensors in the iPhone. the first is in the dock connector. ho;d the iphone at about a 30 degree angle and shine a light in the dock connector. there is a small white square under the connector.

      the second is in the headphone jack. if you shine a light into the jack you will see a white square in the bottom of the hole.

      hope this helps.
    1. treble26's Avatar
      treble26 -
      Quote Originally Posted by cheesehotdog View Post
      Are you serious ? LOL!
      this trick usually works about 98% of the time, i must say. its a great trick my friend had left his iphone in his bag out on a soccer field and then it started to rain, unfortunately his iphone 3gs did get wet. so i told him about the trick and he gave it to me to do it instead so i replaced the white indicator with a piece of photo paper (it was the only paper i had at the moment) and he took it to the apple store and got it replaced for free. apple employees are not allowed to open the devices. so the odds of them finding out that you removed the indicator strip is very slim.
    1. iphone8130hak's Avatar
      iphone8130hak -
      Wow
    1. goodluck4287's Avatar
      goodluck4287 -
      I quit working there a few months ago...

      First thing a Mac Genius (or appointed salesperson does) is stares down the two moisture filters, they act like they're helping you while they're doing that. Really, take them a broken iPhone, you'll either see them do that, or take it to the back, where they will inevitably stare it down and get a second opinion if need be.

      Sure, they're protecting the company, but its a delightful facade that they put on to make you believe YOU are benefiting from that.