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  • Boot Camp to Support Windows on Mac. Um, Soon. Unless...


    On the day of Windows 7's release, Apple posted a terse Knowledge Base article promising Boot Camp support for the new operating system. However, the capability will only be available in a future update to the utility, which is slated for release sometime before the end of the year.

    Apple will support Microsoft Windows 7 (Home Premium, Professional, and Ultimate) with Boot Camp in Mac OS X Snow Leopard before the end of the year. This support will require a software update to Boot Camp.
    Additionally, the article noted without explanation that nine Mac models manufactured in 2006 will not have Windows 7 support:
    • iMac (17-inch, Early 2006)
    • iMac (17-inch, Late 2006)
    • iMac (20-inch, Early 2006)
    • iMac (20-inch, Late 2006)
    • MacBook Pro (15-inch, Early 2006)
    • MacBook Pro (17-inch, Late 2006)
    • MacBook Pro (15-inch, Late 2006)
    • MacBook Pro (17-inch, Early 2006)
    • Mac Pro (Mid 2006, Intel Xeon Dual-core 2.66GHz or 3GHz)

    Observers have hypothesized that the omissions are related to drivers - for peripherals like the iSight camera, trackpad, Bluetooth, backlit keyboard etc. - that won't run on those systems under Windows. Windows 7 can be installed on these Macs and may work fine, though the affected devices may show some glitches. However, it's also possible that Windows may auto-detect the devices and load compatible drivers.

    At the same time, though, it's unclear what these nine models have in common that is not also shared by other Macs. From AppleInsider:
    The Early 2006 iMacs and MacBook Pro models have 32-bit Core Duo CPUs, but the other models specified all use 64-bit Core 2 Duos or Xeon processors, and no other 32-bit Macs (MacBooks, mini) are on the list...
    The only other common thread between these machines is that they all originally shipped with either no or disabled support for 802.11n wireless networking. However, late 2006 MacBooks also shipped with disabled support for 802.11n, and no Mac minis supported 802.11n until 2009, so this does not appear to be a factor either.
    image via InfoWorld
    This article was originally published in forum thread: Boot Camp to Support Windows on Mac. Um, Soon. Unless... started by Paul Daniel Ash View original post
    Comments 47 Comments
    1. tyfly867's Avatar
      tyfly867 -
      I have 64-bit windows 7 working on my iMac (20-inch, Late 2006), except i cant get windows to recognize the bluetooth. Sucks because the only non-bluetooth mouse i have doesnt have a right-click (the old apple pro mouse).
    1. ceramicwhite's Avatar
      ceramicwhite -
      LOL im writing this on Windows 7 on my 06' iMac, and YES Windows does detect the drivers and updates no problem at all, but the sound driver doesn't and I am still soundless :/
    1. hollow0's Avatar
      hollow0 -
      Quote Originally Posted by ceramicwhite View Post
      LOL im writing this on Windows 7 on my 06' iMac, and YES Windows does detect the drivers and updates no problem at all, but the sound driver doesn't and I am still soundless :/
      What version of macbook do you have 13"? because i can probably fix that for you...assuming you had the same problem i did. i have the 13 and i had no sound but a rep from apple showed me how to get it to work.
    1. cpkirkley's Avatar
      cpkirkley -
      Quote Originally Posted by n00neimp0rtant View Post
      No, you've ALWAYS needed one. You've just only now been enlightened that you do.
      I hate statements like this, its just as elitist as those jerks who assume that people that use macs are idiots who can't "handle" a PC.

      I am a (partial) windows to mac covert, but only partially. The only reason that I purchased my MBP was for asthetic reasons. Aluminum is seksi.

      Now I do use osx for all of my basic mobile non-professional needs - I.E web, personal email, itunes, iphone activities - but even for that, its only because OSX boots faster, which it should on a mac, lol.

      I haven't really been blown away with how things "just work", in fact I'm quite pissed about 2 years ago when my woefully underclocked x1600 was giving me artifacts all the time. Apple's stance on the subject? "Buy a new 2500 machine, you cheapo!" So I did, and then a few weeks ago, Apple finally admits that the second 2500 dollar machine that I purchased from them has more GPU issues - Their response up until recently: "Buy a new 2500 machine, you cheapo!" Can anyone tell me why apple doesn't include a fan setting program for a solid piece of aluminum that cooks your lap until it endangers your ability to have children? Why, at the very least on Apple hardware, can I not sync my 3gs wirelessly? Why do I have to pay like 125 percent extra for the same ram I can buy on newegg?Why does apple wave the banner of creative freedom, and then slam the door on being creative with their ideas, even if we're not interested from profiting off it?

      I love the asthetic appearance of mac laptops, and quite frankly, nothing else was able to convince me to make the switch. If a PC maker could come up with a design to sway me away from a MBP, I'd switch back, saving 1200 bucks on my purchase, gaining a few FPS in my benchmarks, and regaining the ability to easily upgrade my hardrive. All my home computers have been, and always will be, of the homebuilt PC variety. XBMC + 1080p PC Gaming + Unrestricted Intel Hardware = Win. I do not now, nor will I ever in the future, NEED osx in my life. At least any more than I would need Windows. Mytwocents.
    1. dale1v's Avatar
      dale1v -
      Quote Originally Posted by cpkirkley View Post
      The only reason that I purchased my MBP was for asthetic reasons. Aluminum is seksi.
      That's all I needed to see to know when to stop reading.
    1. cpkirkley's Avatar
      cpkirkley -
      Quote Originally Posted by dale1v View Post
      That's all I needed to see to know when to stop reading.
      When compared to other similarly spec'd machines. the only thing that makes a Macbook "worth" the price of admission (To a person on the fence between MAC and PC) is its asthetic factor. If i wasn't as interested in the appearance of the machine, I could purchased a better performing ASUS for half of the price, and the OSX86'd it...

      And to further illustrate my point, I would have never even CONSIDERED a MBP, seksi or not, if I couldnt run windows natively. Without boot camp, apple would still be in the trendy but ultimately isolated corner of computing universe. The switch to intel hardware was necessary for them to even compete in the future. Cant sell 2000 dollar machines based on hardware that couldnt hold a candle to 1000 dollar PC machines in a performance benchmark test.

      Too bad you didn't read the entire thing, because I was hoping that someone could give me a reason to acquiesce and retract my statements. Yours didn't do it.

      Face it. Apple's machines are very well made. Enough so that people (like myself) who may be underwhelmed by other aspects of apple operation, will consider the purchase based on that factor alone. Does that make me a pretentious, image conscious toolbag? Maybe. But it doesnt make me an idiot. I just saw what I liked, and because I was/am fortunate enough to be able to afford to make a decision like that, I made the plunge. Please explain whay that is so wrong to you?
    1. rhekt's Avatar
      rhekt -
      boot camp. i love the irony