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  • Creepy Heartbeat Recognition Coming To The iPhone?



    We've all heard of voice recognition, finger print sensors, and even retina scans, but the latest security feature that could become the next big thing is a wee but creepier - and maybe also a bit cooler - than other user-detection methods. According to a patent application from you know who, the folks in Cupertino may be tinkering with the prospect of an embedded iPhone security feature that would essentially "lock out" anyone's who's "cardiac signal" doesn't match that of the iPhone's owner or other authorized user.

    According to our friends at Patently Apple:

    Apple's first high-end enterprise quality biometric security system patent surfaced back in March of 2009 and with today's patent, Apple takes a giant leap forward in biometric security.
    The Apple patent in question - dubbed the "Seamlessly Embedded Heart Rate Monitor" - effectively provides a functionality by which a unique iPhone sensor detects a user's heartbeat on contact with the device. And somehow - don't ask me to explain this part - the "biometric data" can be ingested by the iPhone to determine if your identity matches that the of the device's authorized user(s). Here's how the patent application puts it: "The durations of particular portions of a user's heart rhythm, or the relative size of peaks of a user's electrocardiogram (EKG) can be processed and compared to a stored profile to authenticate a user of the device."

    For years, Apple has had its finger on the "pulse" of the smartphone industry, but this development certainly takes the cake. So sophisticated is the technology in development that the iPhone would be sensitive to far more than just the detection of a heartbeat. In fact, the patent explains that the sensor in question is intelligent enough to analyze the personalized characteristics of one's heartbeat, looking for subtle factors and other nuances that can distinguish an unauthorized user from an authorized one.

    Naturally, it doesn't seem likely the this extraordinary feature will be in place for the launch of the 4th generation iPhone, which could be rolled out in a matter of weeks. But Apple is obviously gearing up for the future and endeavoring to delve deep into the heart - pun intended - of biometric data and its use in their revolutionary smartphone.

    Image via Patently Apple
    This article was originally published in forum thread: Creepy Heartbeat Recognition Coming To The iPhone? started by Michael Essany View original post
    Comments 28 Comments
    1. law111's Avatar
      law111 -
      "but the latest security feature that could become the next big thing is a wee but creepier"

      a wee bit* you mean
    1. moon#pie's Avatar
      moon#pie -
      Quote Originally Posted by law111 View Post
      "but the latest security feature that could become the next big thing is a wee but creepier"

      a wee bit* you mean
      naw, he meant to say "but the latest security feature that could become the next big thing is a wii, but creepier"
    1. andyharp's Avatar
      andyharp -
      easy....it also uses the camera to address these problems. if your hot and sweaty looking it adjusts the heart rate up. if your blue it allows you to make emergency calls only. ha!
    1. brownmann's Avatar
      brownmann -
      Quote Originally Posted by the french bum View Post
      That's a crock of ****. So what? If you end up with an intermittent bundle branch block or your PR interval widens you'll get locked out of your phone? I call bull ****. Cardiac rhythms change with age, diet and medications. There is not way that a phone can ever take an accurate ECG, standard, "easi" or 12 lead.

      This is a crock.
      completely agree. an EKG is in no way like a fingerprint. It is a dynamic electrical reading of your hearts electrical activity. i dont belive it is practical to use it for identity as the above user said, it changes. speaking from a medical standpoint, this is a useless and very unreliable method of identification assuming the phone produces an accurate EKG (which it probably wont). Plus the thought of being locked out of your phone in the early stages of a heart attack is scary. my 2 cents

      PS good luck to the med student/resident/doctor who wrote the post i quoted.

      pursue the dream.
    1. the french bum's Avatar
      the french bum -
      Quote Originally Posted by brownmann View Post
      completely agree. an EKG is in no way like a fingerprint. It is a dynamic electrical reading of your hearts electrical activity. i dont belive it is practical to use it for identity as the above user said, it changes. speaking from a medical standpoint, this is a useless and very unreliable method of identification assuming the phone produces an accurate EKG (which it probably wont). Plus the thought of being locked out of your phone in the early stages of a heart attack is scary. my 2 cents

      PS good luck to the med student/resident/doctor who wrote the post i quoted.

      pursue the dream.
      I'm a cardiac tech. If there is one thing I know, it's the heart. And this app is in no way shape or form worth 99 cents.
    1. Apollo_316's Avatar
      Apollo_316 -
      Wow...forget the heart attack issue...think of the bomb applications! "If my heartbeat stops my iphone will signal your deaths!" lmao this is rediculas!

      Or how about this, your holding your phone and the phone uses it's sensors to know that it wasn't handed to another person but detects irregularities in your pulse it could automatically dial 911 for you!

      *Think outside the phone*
    1. magusxxx's Avatar
      magusxxx -
      Now you can put it in front of the Grinche's chest and hear as well as see his heart grow.
    1. dale2's Avatar
      dale2 -
      you guys wondering about the phone not letting you make emergency calls in a heart attack, even locked iphones make emergency calls.
      hell, even iphones without sim cards make emergency calls