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  • Google Music Service To Challenge iTunes Dominance


    Google is now courting major music labels for their proposed new music service, Google Music. Their proposed new music service will include the usual digital downloads, but also expand on the iTunes model to include a subscription cloud-based “digital locker.” Many have wondered if and when iTunes would venture into the cloud, now it seems that Google is set to get there first.

    According to industry insiders, the proposed music service would resemble the familiar iTunes business model, but would expand this service to include cloud-based music storage. It is said that users would be able to download songs, and for a $25 yearly fee, be able to store their songs in a “digital locker.” Then users would be able to stream their music to any internet-connected device. Also, users of the service would be able to listen to full-track streams of any song one time before purchasing, then previews would revert back to the usual 30-second sample.

    The most intriguing feature of Google Music is its ability to scan a subscriber’s hard drive for music. Every music track licensed to Google would then be accessible to the user though their “digital locker.” The scan of the user’s hard drive would not differentiate where the tracks came from originally, but would allow users to listen to those songs as if they purchased them though Google Music in the first place.

    If Google is able to get a majority of the Music exec’s to go along with their new music service, it would be a real contender to iTunes’ dominance. The music industry is notoriously difficult to deal with at times, especially when new technology is involved. We’ll see if Google has the negotiating skills to pull off a deal of this magnitude, the way Steve Jobs has been able to, time and time again. If Google Music does see the light of day in this proposed form, it will be a real treat for music lovers everywhere. How awesome would that be: to finally be able to access music from anywhere, at any time.

    Source: Billboard
    This article was originally published in forum thread: Google Music Service To Challenge iTunes Dominance started by Wiley John Wright View original post
    Comments 38 Comments
    1. GenesisDH's Avatar
      GenesisDH -
      Welcome back to life, Lala... LOL

      The one-time full song playback before purchase, digital library/locker, scanning your computer's library and allow a virtual copy of your tracks online, and the ability to buy songs from the site too. That WAS Lala. This idea isn't new.

      The thing is, Lala had the same trouble with the record labels getting song catalogs to sell and stream online. Many older songs and even a good number of newer, more popular songs and artists never showed up. Google no doubt will have trouble getting this service up and running.

      Also, the one-time and online playback option would have to be DRMed in some way, otherwise a wise enough Chrome/FIrefox/Safari add-on/extension programmer would find a way to rip those tracks easily and Google gets little to no money from it. Just saying.
    1. tudtran's Avatar
      tudtran -
      This maybe 10 years too late. But if the prices are cheaper, then I would consider using it.
    1. stevelucky's Avatar
      stevelucky -
      Quote Originally Posted by boxxa View Post
      Think you are right:

      Every music track licensed to Google would then be accessible to the user though their “digital locker.”
      You guys aren't getting it.

      Every music track licensed to Google would then be accessible to the user though their “digital locker.” The scan of the user’s hard drive would not differentiate where the tracks came from originally, but would allow users to listen to those songs as if they purchased them though Google Music in the first place.
      This means that if you have album X on your computer, and that album is licensed to Google so that they can sell it, when they scan your hard drive it will be treated as if you had purchased it through Google. It doesn't matter where you got it from.

      While this is a KILLER feature, I just can't see how Google will be able to make this happen. That seems like too high a hurdle. I can't imagine the labels getting on board with that.
    1. Rokesomesmeefer's Avatar
      Rokesomesmeefer -
      Quote Originally Posted by whereswaldo View Post
      I can only wonder where this will end up...
      The toilet


      Sent from my iPod touch using ModMyi
      Maybe it will, maybe it won't. At the very least, it will force Apple to make a few consumer-friendly changes. Google has churned out many services that failed, but some of those lit fires beneath the asses of the competition, forcing them to make changes that were in many cases better for the consumer.
    1. carolinamic's Avatar
      carolinamic -
      I think this has strong legs. Money talks in any industry and advertising is still a big business too. So with that said I'll look forward to spending my 2 bucks a month to listen to my music and free up some space on my hard drive. 2c
    1. MindGem's Avatar
      MindGem -
      I only use iTunes to.... I almost never use iTunes I just restore with it, and I stream music with spotify.
    1. sh33436's Avatar
      sh33436 -
      So we would have to for the cloud service to be able to get music transferred to idevice. Then pay 25 on top of that man. Apple find someway to get u, I really hope that the jailbreak people find do something for that.
    1. AmadeusKaelPyralis's Avatar
      AmadeusKaelPyralis -
      I agree with Fish. Scanning the hard drive may give up people who may pirate music (think what you will but some do it from necessity) or give listener information.

      However wouldn't streaming music in this fashion kill data usage plans or is this a WiFi thing and I'm just too dense to know that.
    1. Jahooba's Avatar
      Jahooba -
      Competition is a beautiful thing.
    1. Rokesomesmeefer's Avatar
      Rokesomesmeefer -
      Quote Originally Posted by AmadeusKaelPyralis View Post
      I agree with Fish. Scanning the hard drive may give up people who may pirate music (think what you will but some do it from necessity) or give listener information.

      However wouldn't streaming music in this fashion kill data usage plans or is this a WiFi thing and I'm just too dense to know that.
      I'd rather stream my own music than Pandora, and this shouldn't kill a data plan any more than Pandora would.
    1. StealthBravo's Avatar
      StealthBravo -
      I really dig the cloud music concept
    1. LamboFan's Avatar
      LamboFan -
      This is going to be nice!
    1. mwr_allen's Avatar
      mwr_allen -
      It's taken Google this long to make a stand against iTunes?? They have no chance whatsoever, Google will make money from it I have no doubt of but it's a huge task, the only way for Google Music to really compete is to do FREE MUSIC.
      I can't see this ever working better than iTunes.
    1. awesomeSlayer's Avatar
      awesomeSlayer -
      This sounds good...except for yearly fees

      However, $25 yearly fee is rather cheap.
    1. StealthBravo's Avatar
      StealthBravo -
      Apple will kill it if they just drop lala
    1. Dorkenstein909's Avatar
      Dorkenstein909 -
      Quote Originally Posted by madczech View Post
      this is great news!!! but I guess it will never be a replacement for itunes for those iDevice owners, but a cool enhancement to the way we listen to music! Ill guess there will be an app for this just kiddin, Apple wouldn't let this happen
      They better let it happen! they're becoming the worst kind of monopoly...
    1. AmadeusKaelPyralis's Avatar
      AmadeusKaelPyralis -
      What is Pandora? And what can of data drain can I expect on Pandora or any streaming service? I listen to music for about seven hours a day so this kind of service might interest me.
    1. Fenderbender's Avatar
      Fenderbender -
      This could be cool if the quality doesn't suck. Convenience means nothing if the music sounds like crap. If it does I'll start buying more vinyl.