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  • Apple's New Low-end iMac Contains Non-upgradeable, Soldered Memory


    On Wednesday, Apple released a new low-end 21.5" iMac for only $1099, and while the idea was to offer a capable machine at a fraction of the price of the higher-end models, it has been getting quite the negative press from reports all over the Internet.

    We just recently shared how the machine was scoring up to 40% worse in multi-core processing compared to the higher-end 21.5" iMac, but another negative has been discovered by well-known aftermarket computing company Other World Computing (OWC).

    We had wondered when we checked out the new iMac earlier this morning why there was no option to upgrade the memory in the machine, but now it has become clear to us. The memory, as you can see above, is now soldered into the main board in the computer, meaning that there is no way to upgrade the memory neither by way of aftermarket support, nor from Apple directly from their factories.

    It's also worth mentioning that the memory in the higher-end 21.5" iMac can be upgraded.

    The new low-end iMac sports the following specs: a 1.4Ghz dual-core Intel i5 processor with Turbo Boost that can clock the processor up to 2.7Ghz when necessary, one 8GB memory module, a 500GB hard disk drive, and Intel HD 5000 graphics.

    After hearing not only how poorly the machine scored compared to its bigger brother, which is only another $200, and now after learning that the machine can't even have its memory upgraded, we have plenty of reasons why you should probably pass on purchasing this low-end 21.5" iMac.

    On the other hand, if you're interested in grabbing one anyway, you can learn more about the machine from Apple's online store at this link.

    Sources: OWC
    This article was originally published in forum thread: Apple's New Low-end iMac Contains Non-upgradeable, Soldered Memory started by Anthony Bouchard View original post
    Comments 4 Comments
    1. Jahooba's Avatar
      Jahooba -
      Wow, $1100 for a low-end Apple computer? I can build a high-end PC for that much.

      Also, I didn't know the i5 came in a dual-core variation. I wonder if it's one of the many low-power 'mobile' i5's.
    1. luvmytj's Avatar
      luvmytj -
      Pretty sure the low end iMac model has had non-serviceable RAM since last year.
      Also, the i5 processor is obviously not a mobile version by looking at the specs.
    1. Slim J's Avatar
      Slim J -
      Quote Originally Posted by Jahooba View Post
      Wow, $1100 for a low-end Apple computer? I can build a high-end PC for that much.

      Also, I didn't know the i5 came in a dual-core variation. I wonder if it's one of the many low-power 'mobile' i5's.
      I agree. Even though I was able to get a free copy of Windows through my school and reused my disk reader and my grapgics card from my old computer (I reused it because I upgraded the graphics card in my old computer about 6 months prior to building my desktop) and it was a decent card. I ended up building a decent computer for about $750. While I do need to upgrade the graphics again because with the next gen games coming out, it is starting to get slightly sluggish on graphics (mainly because it's a 1 GB card and most games now recommend 2-3 GB cards). With CPU though, it's a beast as it is liquid cooled i7 4770k overclocked at 4.4 GHz and it doesn't get hot at all (the hottest it gets is about 38 Celsius on a full load). Please tell me how iMacs are worth it since they can't do that twice the money and let alone, my 3 year old Toshiba laptop has better specs than it too and I got that for $650 and it still feels fast today and even has a i7.
    1. edwilk55's Avatar
      edwilk55 -
      Kind of disappointing on Apple's part. Esp for the price diff.