• Your favorite

    Apple

    ,

    iPhone

    ,

    iPad

    ,

    iOS

    ,
    Jailbreak
    , and
    Cydia
    site.
  • Apple's A7 SoC Left Chipmakers Panicking According to a Qualcomm Employee


    The 64-bit A7 system-on-a-chip found in Apple’s iPhone 5S caught several market-leading chipmakers off guard when it was debuted in September, a move that one Qualcomm insider says put the industry in panic mode. In a recent report from Dan Lyon’s blog, HubSpot, an unnamed source at Qualcomm mentioned that Apple’s A7 “hit us in the gut,” referring to the silicon’s support for 64-bit processing. The person said the following regarding the matter:

    Not just us, but everyone, really. We were slack-jawed, and stunned, and unprepared. It's not that big a performance difference right now, since most current software won't benefit. But in Spinal Tap terms its like, 32 more, and now everyone wants it.
    Apple’s A7 SoC holds the distinction of being the first 64-bit application processor to be used in a smartphone. Before the debut of the iPhone 5S, companies didn’t see the need to include such an advanced processor in a handheld mobile device as apps weren’t able to take advantage of the extra horsepower. Even now, only a few programs outside of Apple’s own stable are capable of addressing the technology. The source continued by mentioning the following:

    The roadmap for 64-bit was nowhere close to Apple's, since no one thought it was that essential. The evolution was going to be steady. Sure, it's neat, it's the future, but it's not really essential for conditions now.
    The Cupertino California company managed to keep the A7 a secret until the iPhone’s unveiling in September, which was quite an achievement considering the abundance of parts leaks leading up to the event. At the time of the A7’s release, the former chief marketing officer Anand Chandrasekher scoffed at the prospect of a 64-bit smartphone chip. Unsurprisingly he is no longer working at the same post and was reassigned with the company clarifying its stance on the issue calling Chandrasekher’s comments “inaccurate.”

    With the 64-bit A7 chip powering the iPhone 5S, iPad Air, and iPad mini with Retina display, the insider views Apple as being at least one year ahead of the competition if not more. Despite having the tech on a roadmap, chipmakers can’t flip a switch and move their prospective timelines forward on such short notice, so it will definitely be challenging for them. The Qualcomm employee was quite straight forward with some of his remarks such as the following one:

    Apple kicked everybody in the balls with this. It's being downplayed, but it set off panic in the industry.
    What’s your take on the matter? Do you iPhone 5S users notice a significant improvement?

    Source: HubSpot (blog)
    This article was originally published in forum thread: Apple's A7 SoC Left Chipmakers Panicking According to a Qualcomm Employee started by Akshay Masand View original post
    Comments 7 Comments
    1. holyshnikes's Avatar
      holyshnikes -
      I was so happy to see that the iPhone 5s had the 64 bit processor. I read so much of the leaked information, I was starting to think Apple couldn't surprise anyone anymore.

      This article shows what I was thinking at the time. I knew, just as many others would think, that others are going to try and do it too so they can say "us too! Look! We got it too!".
      I only hope other companies, such as samsung, don't rush their 64bit processor just to show that they have the specs. Knowing the track record of the falsifying specs samsung outs out though, I don't have much hope that they will put together a quality item. Just my two scents.
    1. kalpesh78's Avatar
      kalpesh78 -
      Quote Originally Posted by holyshnikes View Post
      I was so happy to see that the iPhone 5s had the 64 bit processor. I read so much of the leaked information, I was starting to think Apple couldn't surprise anyone anymore.

      This article shows what I was thinking at the time. I knew, just as many others would think, that others are going to try and do it too so they can say "us too! Look! We got it too!".
      I only hope other companies, such as samsung, don't rush their 64bit processor just to show that they have the specs. Knowing the track record of the falsifying specs samsung outs out though, I don't have much hope that they will put together a quality item. Just my two scents.
      So apple does have some tricks up its sleeve after-all. Love the 5S.
    1. *T*'s Avatar
      *T* -
      It wasn't leaked because your typical Asian wage employee doesn't know the difference between 64 bit and a pebble.

      Besides that, 64 bit isn't really a big deal because nothing really uses it. I doubt most consumers even know what 64 bit is except that it's "better." Just shows how Qualcomm has no idea what people actually want.
    1. Jahooba's Avatar
      Jahooba -
      Apple did the same thing with the first iPhone. Although, Apple mobile devices still don't allow you to change the fonts, so it's still a silly mix of innovative and utterly stupid.
    1. bigboyz's Avatar
      bigboyz -
      Can't wait to see the iPhone 6 with new design and faster internals. That one will be a head turner for sure.
    1. politicalslug's Avatar
      politicalslug -
      It doesn't seem far from obvious that 64bit was needed. More so for Android than Apple. Flagship Android devices are already including 3GB of RAM so they are nearly to the point of requiring 64bit memory addressing. Apple devices on the other hand are content with a fraction of that RAM. RAM isn't the only reason to move to 64bit, but it seems obvious that ever-increasing amounts of it require that jump sooner than later. Everyone was hesitant to upgrade X86 processors roughly a decade ago, but why wait until the last minute when there is no time like the present?
    1. PokemonDesigner's Avatar
      PokemonDesigner -
      I've noticed a big difference. But then again I came from a 4S to a 5S so my difference was easily more noticeable than say that of an iPhone 5 user. I love it and would never be able to switch back to my horribly slow feeling 4S (even if the 4S was the last nice feeling iPhone before this horrid screen design choice for the 5+).