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  • Apple Offers Insight on In-App Purchase Settlement


    Apple is gearing up to shell out refunds to a reported 23 million people.

    The massive refund stems back to a 2011 class-action suit against the company which made a strong case for "unlawful exploitation" of young customers. Put differently, Apple will be paying up for all those parents whose kids may have made unauthorized purchases that mom and dad were stuck with sans their permission or even knowledge.

    Apple denies all allegations and is entering into this settlement to avoid burdensome and costly litigation. The settlement is not an admission of wrongdoing.
    On Monday, Apple emailed a detailed legal notice to all participants abut how the settlement collection process will work and all deadlines pertinent to payment requests.

    To claim their share of the benefit, class members are required to submit a valid "Claim Form" online or postmarked by Jan. 13, 2014.

    Parents whose kids downloaded $30 or less worth of content will be compensated with a $5 iTunes gift card (or, Apple says, the equivalent of their total Game Currency charges). Today's email notification also revealed that cash refunds will be given but only to consumers without an active iTunes account (or if their bill is greater than $30).

    To opt out, class members must send a request postmarked by August 30th.

    A detailed notice and Claim Form package contains everything you need and is available here.

    Source: Apple
    This article was originally published in forum thread: Apple Offers Insight on In-App Purchase Settlement started by Michael Essany View original post
    Comments 12 Comments
    1. Sniper488's Avatar
      Sniper488 -
      I've said all along the in app purchases for children was wrong...
    1. REMED1AL's Avatar
      REMED1AL -
      Force sign-in on every purchase. Leave an opt-out option for normal people.

      These parents must log into their amazon account and be shocked when their kid orders a bunch of crap too. What happened to parents taking responsibility for their kids?
    1. HeliPilot's Avatar
      HeliPilot -
      HMMMM...A little knowledge can save some $$$$. I personally don't think Apple should be on the hook here.
      It looks like this; Settings/General/Restrictions=ON/In App Purchases=OFF, Require Password=IMMEDIATELY.
      Blocks everything so there is no possible way to get IAP.
    1. Sniper488's Avatar
      Sniper488 -
      It would still download in app purchases with password on, read up on it.
    1. HeliPilot's Avatar
      HeliPilot -
      Quote Originally Posted by Sniper488 View Post
      It would still download in app purchases with password on, read up on it.
      Thus the redundancy of requiring the password immediately. My Grand kids have tried more then once using my iPad and they get nowhere.
    1. Cokeman's Avatar
      Cokeman -
      Quote Originally Posted by Sniper488 View Post
      I've said all along the in app purchases for children was wrong...
      It is the responsibility of the parents to monitor their children. I have 3 kids that have never cost me money, without permission from the wife or me. Parental controls are there for a reason. Any parent that hands over a device tied to a iTunes account, with a credit card on file...they deserve it. This should not be on Apple.
    1. Sniper488's Avatar
      Sniper488 -
      Again do a little more reading on this...
    1. HeliPilot's Avatar
      HeliPilot -
      Quote Originally Posted by Sniper488 View Post
      Again do a little more reading on this...
      Not really sure what you are eluding to. The research I've done points squarely at parents not being willing or able to curb their children. The safe guards are in place as you can see by the above posts, the inability of parents to use these safe guards should not fall on Apple.
      Now, to the broader problem. Advertisers have been marketing to kids for years, toys, games, sugary cerials, ...etc, and it will never go away. Still, and always will be the parents responsibility to regulate these things, same goes for IAP.
      In the end I see this as another "It's not my fault" lawsuit that should have been shot down from the beginning.
    1. Sniper488's Avatar
      Sniper488 -
      I agree but one of the things you missed is you can set a password for your phone/iPad but if you downloaded something off App Store which then forced you to enter your password to download, then there were so many minutes after you punched in your Passcode that if you handed your child the device and they started playing the game you just downloaded, they could start in app purchasing and it would never ask for a Passcode within so many minutes of you entering it. So, your child could rack up some cash on your bill and you thought they were locked out.
      Second thing which I think is morally wrong is that you can download a child's app, an app made for kids 6 and younger, and in that app a child could in app purchase a $100 add on with a tap of one button. Yes, you can turn Passcode protection on but still, $100 for a CHILD'S game. The industry knows what it's doing.
    1. ZSakowski's Avatar
      ZSakowski -
      Where were the parents at?!
    1. Sniper488's Avatar
      Sniper488 -
      Lol, did you not just read what I wrote???
    1. Rcworship's Avatar
      Rcworship -
      My kids bought a $10 game on the Xbox 360 while my wife and I were out of town. One booboo on my part. Never again. Yup, it's up to me to deal with the terrible inconvenience of inputting my passcodes any time I need to buy something. Oh, woe is me!