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  • Apple Flooded with Police Demands to Decrypt iPhones


    The iPhone’s encryption is apparently secure enough that even law enforcement agencies are waiting in line to have Apple “crack” the lock and provide data to be used as evidence. According to a report by the folks at CNET, Apple has the ability to decrypt seized iPhones and has created a waiting list to handle the incoming requests.

    At one point last summer, the wait was over seven weeks long and one ATF agent reported that it took his request four months to be processed. The ATF had tried to decrypt the iPhone 4S of a Kentucky man who was accused of distributing drugs and became so frustrated that it contacted Apple for assistance, which is where the wait started.

    Those of you who are at all concerned about how secure your personal information is on an iOS device should be relieved at the fact that devices can’t be cracked by federal agents. No one is entirely sure how Apple can decrypt the information for the police. Whether there is a backdoor that only Apple knows about, has custom hardware for decryption of iOS devices, or just has better-trained cryptologists.

    There are products that are supposed to help crack codes, such as Elcomsoft’s iOS Forensic Toolkit, which claims to crack a four-digit iOS 4 or iOS 5 passcode in less than 40 minutes. It’s when someone uses a PIN or password with more characters that the decryption time takes a much longer time. The post cites Simson Garfinkel from the U.S. Naval Postgraduate School, who estimates that cracking a 10-digit PIN could take as long as 25 years using common brute-force methods.

    What this really means for the average law-abiding citizen is that a longer passphrase or PIN can keep your iOS data protected. For those engaged in illegal activities, it should be known that Apple knows how to free your data to law enforcement and will do just that.

    Source: CNET
    This article was originally published in forum thread: Apple Flooded with Police Demands to Decrypt iPhones started by Akshay Masand View original post
    Comments 28 Comments
    1. fanboyfanboy's Avatar
      fanboyfanboy -
      Quote Originally Posted by CCNPJediHacker View Post
      Lol, lots of posters here look like they have lots to hide Don't do the crime then you have nothing to worry about. Only criminals would worry about such a thing;/
      Or we have a right to privacy, and police shouldn't be able to look through our phones on a"hunch" that we might have something illegal when really it's just something personal.
    1. vinaygoel2000's Avatar
      vinaygoel2000 -
      Quote Originally Posted by fanboyfanboy View Post
      Or we have a right to privacy, and police shouldn't be able to look through our phones on a"hunch" that we might have something illegal when really it's just something personal.
      When it's a matter of national security, a "hunch" is more than what they need to look through your phone, your house and your work place.
    1. Rob2G's Avatar
      Rob2G -
      If they have the right to look in my phone when they feel I have done something wrong, Do I have the right to look in to any government documents I want when I feel they are doing something wrong? No I don't. They mark it classified and I have no way to access it. Well my phone, iPad and Mac are classified too, they can keep thier hands off.
    1. vinaygoel2000's Avatar
      vinaygoel2000 -
      Quote Originally Posted by Rob2G View Post
      If they have the right to look in my phone when they feel I have done something wrong, Do I have the right to look in to any government documents I want when I feel they are doing something wrong? No I don't. They mark it classified and I have no way to access it. Well my phone, iPad and Mac are classified too, they can keep thier hands off.
      Good luck with that.
    1. NewdestinyX's Avatar
      NewdestinyX -
      Quote Originally Posted by vinaygoel2000 View Post
      Good luck with that.
      +1
    1. fanboyfanboy's Avatar
      fanboyfanboy -
      Quote Originally Posted by vinaygoel2000 View Post
      When it's a matter of national security, a "hunch" is more than what they need to look through your phone, your house and your work place.
      So who's the decider in what's national security and what's not? Exactly there isn't one. A "hunch" can also be some racist acting against a group of people. (and if you are going to tell me there is no racism in america anymore the conversation is over right now). also, if they get a warrant/subpoena ill be glad to open up my phone. But them just going to apple, by passing that and having them do that? Damn right that's a violation of privacy.
    1. ThatOneProfile's Avatar
      ThatOneProfile -
      We are talking about police monitoring people's phones. Not the CIA needing to unlock someones phone for security issues. Two very different levels. It is obvious that it's invasion of privacy w/o a warrant.
    1. fanboyfanboy's Avatar
      fanboyfanboy -
      Quote Originally Posted by ThatOneProfile View Post
      We are talking about police monitoring people's phones. Not the CIA needing to unlock someones phone for security issues. Two very different levels. It is obvious that it's invasion of privacy w/o a warrant.
      I read this story on multiple sites, and not one stated they were obtaining warrants. Just because the phone is in their possession, it not give them right to access the information.