• Your favorite

    Apple

    ,

    iPhone

    ,

    iPad

    ,

    iOS

    ,
    Jailbreak
    , and
    Cydia
    site.
  • Apple Flooded with Police Demands to Decrypt iPhones


    The iPhone’s encryption is apparently secure enough that even law enforcement agencies are waiting in line to have Apple “crack” the lock and provide data to be used as evidence. According to a report by the folks at CNET, Apple has the ability to decrypt seized iPhones and has created a waiting list to handle the incoming requests.

    At one point last summer, the wait was over seven weeks long and one ATF agent reported that it took his request four months to be processed. The ATF had tried to decrypt the iPhone 4S of a Kentucky man who was accused of distributing drugs and became so frustrated that it contacted Apple for assistance, which is where the wait started.

    Those of you who are at all concerned about how secure your personal information is on an iOS device should be relieved at the fact that devices can’t be cracked by federal agents. No one is entirely sure how Apple can decrypt the information for the police. Whether there is a backdoor that only Apple knows about, has custom hardware for decryption of iOS devices, or just has better-trained cryptologists.

    There are products that are supposed to help crack codes, such as Elcomsoft’s iOS Forensic Toolkit, which claims to crack a four-digit iOS 4 or iOS 5 passcode in less than 40 minutes. It’s when someone uses a PIN or password with more characters that the decryption time takes a much longer time. The post cites Simson Garfinkel from the U.S. Naval Postgraduate School, who estimates that cracking a 10-digit PIN could take as long as 25 years using common brute-force methods.

    What this really means for the average law-abiding citizen is that a longer passphrase or PIN can keep your iOS data protected. For those engaged in illegal activities, it should be known that Apple knows how to free your data to law enforcement and will do just that.

    Source: CNET
    This article was originally published in forum thread: Apple Flooded with Police Demands to Decrypt iPhones started by Akshay Masand View original post
    Comments 28 Comments
    1. StuG III's Avatar
      StuG III -
      I hope iMessages stay encrypted, and require apple to complete its decryption. There's a lot of force behind an "easy wire tapping" internet by federal institutions. I'm not doing anything illegal but I don't like big brother having to watch over me.
    1. exNavy's Avatar
      exNavy -
      They should go to talk to Jonathan Zdziarski, he's been offering police forensic security courses for years. Thanks for helping me get in that game for awhile too.
    1. *T*'s Avatar
      *T* -
      Good thing my password is 11 characters and has numbers :P
    1. fanboyfanboy's Avatar
      fanboyfanboy -
      I don't have a problem with apple being able to decrypt iPhones. The problem I have is that means one bad leak. And everyone can find out how they do it. One slip of the mouth from an inside employee and you now have that information out to the world. That's what scares me.
    1. tridley68's Avatar
      tridley68 -
      Quote Originally Posted by exNavy View Post
      They should go to talk to Jonathan Zdziarski, he's been offering police forensic security courses for years. Thanks for helping me get in that game for awhile too.
      It is no business to law enforcement what I have in my I phone keep it locked down tight Apple.
    1. vinaygoel2000's Avatar
      vinaygoel2000 -
      Quote Originally Posted by tridley68 View Post
      It is no business to law enforcement what I have in my I phone keep it locked down tight Apple.
      It is if you are planning some criminal activities.
    1. NewdestinyX's Avatar
      NewdestinyX -
      Quote Originally Posted by vinaygoel2000 View Post
      It is if you are planning some criminal activities.
      Exactly. Criminal activity voids your right of privacy.. Jeez - don't they teach basic Civics in high schools anymore?!?
    1. Lohand's Avatar
      Lohand -
      They will give it up eventually if they can. Its all just a matter of working through the request backlogs. Just Sayin...
      Attachment 637520
    1. ThatOneProfile's Avatar
      ThatOneProfile -
      Quote Originally Posted by vinaygoel2000 View Post
      It is if you are planning some criminal activities.

      You're assuming everybody who wants privacy is a criminal. The United States is corrupt. People have banks, credit card #'s and more on their phone. Their life savings is in fingers' reach. Of course we will want as much privacy/secure device as we can get. Wake up and stop thinking like a cop.
    1. jwil736's Avatar
      jwil736 -
      Pssh. This makes me want to remove exchange unlock... I have a 11 digit password with letters, numbers and special characters.
      I'm not hiding anything but value privacy.
    1. vinaygoel2000's Avatar
      vinaygoel2000 -
      Quote Originally Posted by ThatOneProfile View Post
      You're assuming everybody who wants privacy is a criminal. The United States is corrupt. People have banks, credit card #'s and more on their phone. Their life savings is in fingers' reach. Of course we will want as much privacy/secure device as we can get. Wake up and stop thinking like a cop.
      Read what I said again. Don't twist my statement.
    1. KockBurn's Avatar
      KockBurn -
      Quote Originally Posted by vinaygoel2000 View Post
      Read what I said again. Don't twist my statement.
      He didn't twist your statement. He only pointed out that by your own words you seem to agree with the nanny state. Wanting a secure device does not make a criminal. Maybe you need to go read a lil more, or just keep being a smart ***, it's your life.
    1. runey71's Avatar
      runey71 -
      Quote Originally Posted by KockBurn View Post
      He didn't twist your statement. He only pointed out that by your own words you seem to agree with the nanny state. Wanting a secure device does not make a criminal. Maybe you need to go read a lil more, or just keep being a smart ***, it's your life.
      What he said is that law enforcement have the right to the information on your phone if you committing, or planning to commit, criminal activity. He did not say that wanting privacy implied you were perpetrating criminal acts. Read his statement carefully because it can be easily misinterpreted.
    1. fanboyfanboy's Avatar
      fanboyfanboy -
      Quote Originally Posted by runey71 View Post
      What he said is that law enforcement have the right to the information on your phone if you committing, or planning to commit, criminal activity. He did not say that wanting privacy implied you were perpetrating criminal acts. Read his statement carefully because it can be easily misinterpreted.
      And where's the line to determine what the police see as criminal activity? If I have a text and picture confirming the next iPhone and I don't want to show police, why should they be able to force into my phone and see what I'm hiding? It's nothing illegal, but they don't know that and I just don't want to show them.
    1. td1439's Avatar
      td1439 -
      There's no mention of this in the article, but I hope there are warrants or some kind of court order required by Apple before they do this. We're talking about the same government that passed the current NDAA and keeps trying to pass bills like CISPA, after all.
    1. runey71's Avatar
      runey71 -
      Quote Originally Posted by fanboyfanboy View Post
      And where's the line to determine what the police see as criminal activity? If I have a text and picture confirming the next iPhone and I don't want to show police, why should they be able to force into my phone and see what I'm hiding? It's nothing illegal, but they don't know that and I just don't want to show them.
      That's between you and the politicians you vote for.
    1. twitchee3's Avatar
      twitchee3 -
      Quote Originally Posted by td1439 View Post
      There's no mention of this in the article, but I hope there are warrants or some kind of court order required by Apple before they do this. We're talking about the same government that passed the current NDAA and keeps trying to pass bills like CISPA, after all.
      About time someone mentioned the real issue here. Without a warrant, law enforcement has no right to violate your privacy, regardless of what they "think" might be on your phone. Our right to privacy is guaranteed by the constitution, and without a warrant (which must be very specific by the way), it is illegal for any government official to violate that privacy. We are talking about the same government which blatantly suspended the 4th Amendment for thousands of law abiding citizens while searching for a 19 year old college student. At this point, I'd say every American citizen has a duty to be skeptical of the government when they engage in activities which infringe upon our unalienable rights, often for reasons which are never substantiated to a legal degree.

      It's quite likely that all law enforcement requests to Apple on this matter have a legitimate warrant to back them up, however, it's still very important to remain vigilant. The NDAA and CISPA are extremely offensive to the freedom of the people of the United States. Don't let the latest jailbreak tweak distract your from the slow dismantling of our "unalienable" rights.
    1. ecofrankenstein's Avatar
      ecofrankenstein -
      Quote Originally Posted by fanboyfanboy View Post
      And where's the line to determine what the police see as criminal activity? If I have a text and picture confirming the next iPhone and I don't want to show police, why should they be able to force into my phone and see what I'm hiding? It's nothing illegal, but they don't know that and I just don't want to show them.
      Exactly. It doesn't matter what you have/may have/will have on your iPhone, or for that matter, in your home. To assume you have committed something illegal is very different from having actual proof. And this 'proof' doesn't count if the police decide to just take your property for the sake of it. Even criminals have rights because having the title of 'police' on your jacket, doesn't make your hands any cleaner. If anything, the government and police are more corrupt and dirty.
      People are so blind and open to just bending over and giving away your rights. Take a look at what the government is getting away with lately... pitiful.
    1. Lohand's Avatar
      Lohand -
      Quote Originally Posted by td1439 View Post
      but I hope there are warrants or some kind of court order required by Apple before they do this.
      Attachment 637676
    1. CCNPJediHacker's Avatar
      CCNPJediHacker -
      Lol, lots of posters here look like they have lots to hide Don't do the crime then you have nothing to worry about. Only criminals would worry about such a thing;/