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  • One Psystar Lawyer Says They're Done; Another Lawyer Disagrees


    Despite seeming to have come the end of its long legal battle with Apple, the tale of upstart Mac clone maker Psystar will apparently continue to amuse and confuse. On Friday, one of the company's attorneys said that Psystar was shutting down for good and firing its remaining employees. Later that day, the company's website went dark. Today, however, the site is back up and another Psystar attorney is saying the company is still in business.

    Dow Jones reported a statement by Psystar's legal counsel, an attorney with the awesome name of Eugene Action, that founder and president Rudy Pedraza will be "shutting things down immediately," and that all of the company's eight employees will be let go. However, a story appeared in Computerworld late yesterday quoting an attorney with the less awesome but still impressive name of K.A.D. Camara who asserted that the earlier report had been untrue. Camara, of the Houston-based law firm Camara & Sibley, said that “Mr. Action was misquoted in an early story that seems to have been picked up elsewhere. Psystar does not intend to shut down permanently.”

    Psystar had been directed by the court on Tuesday to close its Mac cloning business down. When U.S. District Judge William Alsup gave Apple the win on its injunction, he told Psystar they had until midnight on December 31, 2009, at the latest, to comply.

    Defendant must immediately begin this process, and take the quickest path to compliance; thus, if compliance can be achieved within one hour after this order is filed, defendant shall reasonably see it done.
    The company had to inform Apple of its plans, but it did not have to make those plans public. Camara said that although Psystar was no longer selling systems loaded with Mac OS X, it would continue to sell PCs with other operating systems, including Windows, and would also sell its $50 Rebel EFI bootloader, which the judge had specifically said was not covered by his order.

    Camara indicated that the legal battle was far from over. "Psystar will proceed to litigate the legality of Rebel EFI through the motion process described in Judge Alsup's order," he said. "Psystar will also proceed with its antitrust case in Miami."
    This article was originally published in forum thread: One Psystar Lawyer Says They're Done; Another Lawyer Disagrees started by Paul Daniel Ash View original post